Catholic bishops on the warpath

← return to Belief Blog

Almost every day, it seems, another Catholic bishop is reminding his flock which way to vote depending on where the candidate stands on abortion. Here is a link to Philadelphia Cardinal Justin Rigali’s Oct. 23 column.

“Our role is to teach and form consciences,” he said.

Obviously the prelates fear a cascade of pro-abortion legislation should Sen. Barack Obama get elected. Also, Paterson, N.J. Bishop Arthur Serratelli wrote on the same day about the Freedom of Choice Act, a draconian piece of legislation codifying Roe vs. Wade that would become law should Mr. Obama be elected. (He has promised to sign it). Then there is this from the bishop of Lansing, Mich. and this from the bishop of Honolulu. 

And we can’t forget this “bishop explosion” last Sunday from Scranton, Pa. Bishop Joseph Martino who showed up at one parish election forum to trash what he saw as a bias toward the pro-choice view of things. 

“No social issue has caused the death of 50 million people,” he said, nothing that he no longer supports the Democratic Party. “This is madness people.”

Scranton, as you all know, is Joe Biden’s home diocese.

Hat tip to the Whispers In the Loggia blog that has lined up these statements and more. If Obama wins, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops meeting in Baltimore in mid-November is going to get mighty interesting as the abortion-and-Catholic-politicians topic is on the agenda. I predict the bishops will start taking more and more radical stands if society grows more and more hostile to Catholic teaching on life issues. 

Will the spirit of St. Ambrose, the 2nd century saint who defied the Empress Justina and the Emperor Theodosius, rise again?

- Julia Duin, religion editor, The Washington Times

 


 

← return to Belief Blog

About the Author
Julia Duin

Julia Duin

Julia Duin is the Times' religion editor. She has a master's degree in religion from Trinity School for Ministry (an Episcopal seminary) and has covered the beat for three decades. Before coming to The Washington Times, she worked for five newspapers, including a stint as a religion writer for the Houston Chronicle and a year as city editor at the ...

Latest Stories

Latest Blog Entries

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Happening Now