The Washington Times - November 29, 2009, 11:52AM

When you go 2-10, pretty much everything would presumably be in play to be changed, and not just the head coach.

That would include staff.

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That would include recruiting.

That would incluide the way you go about your business every day.

And it could include schematic adjustments, which Maryland coach Ralph Friedgen hinted last night he would discuss with athletic director Debbie Yow in the coming week.

“I’m going to sit down with Dr. Yow in the next couple days and we’re going to talk about some things,” Friedgen said. “There are some ideas I have from an offensive and a defensive standpoint that could help us. We’ll sit down and talk about the whole program.”

Probably high on the agenda is how to fix an offense that never could overcome the fact its offensive line was a piecemeal collection, many of whom needed an extra year of seasoning to be ready. As it was, the Terps had little choice but to toss them out and see how they fared.

The answer to that is known now. The Terps struggled to run throughout the season, and while the loss of Da’Rel Scott for five games didn’t help, Maryland had some trouble getting traction up front even when he was healthy.

The quarterback situation also dictated a more conventional approach. If there’s one thing Chris Turner was not, it was a shifty runner capable of frequently improvising in the pocket and turning a sack or incompletion into a large gain. He was a pocket passer and an experienced option, and Maryland needed to play to his strengths.

But with Jamarr Robinson presumably the early favorite going into the spring by virtue of his three games worth of experience in November, and athletic freshman C.J. Brown also available, the Terps’ offense could be a bit different next year.

“I talked to James [Franklin] already about some things,” Friedgen said. “Personnel-wise, I think there’s some things that really fit with us that we really don’t do now. Maybe we didn’t do them because of Chris, because it wasn’t his cup of tea. I think with some of the quarterbacks we have in our program, it might make things easier for ourselves up front. I know from past experience it really helps you from a throwing standpoint because it keeps people honest. I don’t want to get into that right now. We’ll see what happens.”

Patrick Stevens