The Washington Times - October 15, 2009, 11:05PM

In his perfect world, Chris Turner would share the national lead in nearly any other category than times sacked.

Well, maybe he wouldn’t want interceptions. But without having asked Turner this (after all, the research for this entry was just done this evening), it’s not a stretch to say this isn’t a good category for anyone to be at the top of the list.

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Funny thing is, one of his closest “challengers” will be at Byrd Stadium on the opposite sideline on Saturday.

Virginia’s Jameel Sewell is fourth nationally and has taken 19 sacks – just two behind Turner’s 21-sack salute.

The Official Dot-Com Diva tackled (no pun intended) this issue a little bit today, but the D1scourse version comes with a patented Spiffy ChartTM to illustrate the point further.

Heading into tonight’s action, only eight quarterbacks have been sacked 18 times or more, at least according to the team stats on Yahoo.  A full rundown, with team record included:

PlayerTeamSacks  
Team W-L  
Zac Dysert
Miami (Ohio)
210-6
G.J. Kinne
Tulsa214-2
Chris Turner
Maryland212-4
Jameel Sewell
Virginia192-3
Jordan Jefferson
Louisiana State  
185-1
Kelly Page
Ball State
180-6
Donovan Porterie  
New Mexico
180-6
Tyler Sheehan
Bowling Green
182-4

What to make of this list?

First of all, some horrifically bad teams are included. No shock there.

But that group of teams, in general, stood out as some of the lousiest rushing outfits in the country.

Tulsa: 43rd (not counting the Boise State game)
Louisiana State: 88th
Virginia: 95th
Maryland: 105th
Ball State: 106th
New Mexico: 107th
Miami (Ohio): 110th
Bowling Green: 120th

Obviously, the surplus of sacks contributes to those rankings. And it’s absolutely zero shock a team that can’t run would be forced to throw more – and create more chances for sacks.

But it’s worth noting that sack issues aren’t merely a function of shaky pass protection. Sometimes the best defense against a voracious pass rush is a running game that can keep it honest.

For the sake of their quarterbacks’ health – and their postseason hopes – both Maryland and Virginia (which admittedly reamed Indiana on the ground last week) need to find a viable rushing game in the second half of the season.

Patrick Stevens