9 sacks: Where do the Redskins go from here?

← return to Daly OT

By the time the Bills were done using John Beck as a trampoline Sunday, they’d registered nine sacks – the most the Redskins have ever allowed. Which raises the question: How did those past Redskins teams respond to such a debacle? Did their season go down in flames, or did they pull themselves together like the professionals they were?

Well, it depends on which season you’re talking about. The details:

Oct. 4, 1964 at D.C. Stadium – Gave up nine sacks in a 23-17 loss to the St. Louis Cardinals. Sonny Jurgensen received most of the abuse, though backup George Izo was dropped for a safety. Interesting game note: The Redskins weren’t blown out that day, as they were in Sunday’s 23-0 lambasting by Buffalo. Indeed, they drove for a late touchdown to pull to within six points.

What happened the next week: The Redskins jumped out to a 21-0 lead against the Eagles and, behind Jurgy’s five TD passes, won 35-20. In fact, they went 6-2 in their next eight games to rebound from an 0-4 start. Final record: 6-8.

Nov. 19, 1978 at RFK Stadium – Yielded nine sacks in a 27-17 loss to the Cardinals. Joe Theismann was the quarterback of record, though – like most accident victims – he probably doesn’t remember much about it. Interesting game note: The Redskins weren’t blown out on this day, either. Indeed, Theismann threw for two touchdowns as they cut a 24-0 deficit to 24-17 in the third quarter. (A Jim Bakken field goal finished them off.)

What happened the next week: The Redskins were routed 37-10 at Dallas and kept right on losing. In fact, they didn’t win another game that year, dropping their last five to end up 8-8.

So these nine-sack atrocities can go either way, Redskins fans. Which way do you think this one is headed?

 

← return to Daly OT

About the Author
Dan Daly

Dan Daly

Dan Daly has been writing about sports for the Washington Times since 1982. He has won numerous national and local awards, appears regularly in NFL Films’ historical features and is the co-author of "The Pro Football Chronicle,” a decade-by-decade history of the game. Follow Dan on Twitter at @dandalyonsports –- or e-mail him at ddaly@washingtontimes.com.

Latest Stories

Latest Blog Entries

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
Happening Now