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GUNS

A blog covering our Second Amendment freedoms featuring Opinion Page Senior Editor Emily Miller. Follow her on Twitter @EmilyMiller

Latest Blog Entries

MILLER: Buying ammunition in D.C.

After I became a gun owner, I needed to find a place to buy a box of 9mm for my gun. The restrictions in the District are strict, but the D.C. gun registry office staff make it more difficult. As I learned, the police who staff the office and are tasked with explaining the gun laws to residents just invent laws that don’t exist.

Emily Miller featured on Fox News

Senior Editor Emily Miller was featured in a Fox News story about Washington, D.C. gun laws. The story is called "Roadblock to legally bear arms?" was from Fox News' Supreme Court correspondent Shannon Bream. It aired on "Special Report with Bret Baier" on Feb. 26.

MILLER: Transporting a gun through D.C.

I had my new, legally-registered Sig Sauer at home for ten days before I figured out how to take it to a nearby state to shoot it. Although I’d spent four hours in a classroom memorizing the gun laws in Washington, D.C. and then passed a written test at the police station, I was still confused about the logistics of legally transporting a gun somewhere to practice. While I finally learned enough to get my gun to a range in Virginia on Friday to shoot it, the laws turned out to be far more complicated than I could have imagined.

MILLER: Next steps for D.C. gun rights

The D.C. City Council is working on legislation this month that could ease some of the gun restrictions in the nation’s capital. While my ultimate goal is to end D.C.'s firearms registration law, I understand the limitations of dealing with a liberal council. My hope is that my personal experience as documented in the “Emily Gets Her Gun” series will help make the current registration process easier for other residents.

MILLER: Rick Perry: D.C. gun laws are unconstitutional

Rick Perry believes the gun-control laws in Washington, D.C. are unconstitutional. “I think it’s an infringement on your Second Amendment,” the Texas governor told me in an interview at the Conservative Political Action Convention (CPAC) in Washington, D.C. on Thursday.

MILLER: Emily got her gun!

I finally got my gun in Washington, D.C. After months of aggravation, hundreds of dollars in fees, countless hours jumping over hurdles, I am now a gun owner and finally exercising my second amendment right to keep arms (bearing arms is still illegal in the nation’s capital). But the “Emily Gets Her Gun” series is far from over ...

MILLER: My gun registration is approved

My application to register my gun in Washington, D.C. was approved! Yet things are still never as simple as they seem when it comes to District gun regulations. I had to delve further into the convoluted and undocumented laws and rules before I could actually bring my gun home.

MILLER: D.C.’s gun re-registration backlog

A gun owner who has cleared the District’s 17 registration hurdles still isn’t home free. To continue exercising the Second Amendment right to keep arms, individuals have to renew registration certificates every three years and show up at the Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) every six years to be fingerprinted.

Emily Miller interviewed on "Fox and Friends"

Senior Editor Emily Miller was on "Fox and Friends" to talk about her efforts to get a legal gun in Washington, D.C. She was interviewed by Fox News' Dave Briggs about The Washington Times' series "Emily Gets Her Gun." The video of the interview is below:

MILLER: My testimony at D.C. city council (VIDEO)

I testified on Monday before the District of Columbia Council’s Judiciary Committee about my experiences and reporting on the gun registration process in the city. Below is the video of my oral testimony, followed by the extensive grilling I got from the committee’s chairman, Phil Mendelson, Democrat At-Large. The text of my statement is below the video.

MILLER: Applying to register a gun in D.C.

While my new gun was being transferred to the District from Virginia, I returned to D.C.’s Gun Registry Office to turn in my registration application. As you will see in what follows, this should have been simple step, but it took all day. Like everything else in my effort to get a legal handgun in this city has been far more complicated and time-consuming that it needed to be.

MILLER: I will testify before D.C. city council about guns

Through the course of writing this series on getting a firearm legally, I’ve become all too familiar with the ins and outs of the registration process in Washington, D.C. Now I will have the opportunity to share my experiences, complaints and suggestions with the local lawmakers who have the power to change these regulations. I will be testifying before the D.C. city council’s Judiciary Committee on Monday, Jan. 30.

MILLER: Transferring a gun into D.C.

I bought my new 9mm Sig Sauer from a dealer in Virginia and needed to get it to the District. When it comes to firearms, a distance of 70 miles might as well be thousands of miles across international borders.

MILLER: I bought a gun, but...

After days of calls, emails, tweets, comments and posts, I finally bought the exact gun I wanted, the two-tone version of the Sig Sauer P229 9mm. I’m so excited, I want to shoot my new purchase, but in the nation’s capital, it's not that simple. Buying a gun doesn’t mean you get to have the gun.