The Washington Times - January 27, 2011, 01:28PM

Opposition to the Democrats’ 2010 health care law ticked upward in January, as Republicans ramped up efforts to repeal the reforms, a new poll says.

Yet while the public remains divided on health reform overall, a survey conducted by researchers from the Kaiser Family Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health also showed there is no groundswell of public support for overturning the law that includes many individual components popular across the political spectrum.

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The share of Americans with unfavorable views of the health reform law rose to 50 percent this month — up from 41 percent in December — while the share holding favorable views remained about the same at 41 percent.

The public also is divided on what should happen next. About as many people want to expand the law or keep it as it is — 28 percent and 19 percent, respectively — as want to repeal and replace the law or simply just repeal it — 23 percent and 20 percent.

The GOP-controlled House this month voted to repeal the law, although the measure is expected to die in the Senate. So Republicans now are expected to turn to efforts to defund and slow down implementation of the law through the appropriations process and other means.

Yet 62 percent of those surveyed say they disapprove of a “slow-down” strategy to dismantle the law. Most Republicans —57 percent — favor defunding health reform in the absence of repeal, but 62 percent of independents are opposed, along with a 84 percent of Democrats.

Even among those who don’t like the law and want to see it repealed, four out of 10 say they disaapprove of cutting off funding.

“The public is frustrated with politics as usual, and may be saying that defunding a law is not how government should work,” said Mollyann Brodie, senior vice president and director of the Kaiser Family Foundation’s Public Opinion and Survey Research group.

The survey was conducted Jan. 4 through Jan. 14 among a nationally representative random sample of 1,502 adults ages 18 and older.