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Brazile: Perry uproar a distraction

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“Another sickening distraction” — that’s what the Democratic consultant who led Al Gore’s 2000 presidential campaign is calling the controversy over a racially-inflammatory word painted on a rock at a hunting camp leased by the family of Texas Gov. Rick Perry.

Donna Brazile wrote on her Twitter feed Monday afternoon that she hopes “Gov Rick Perry’s explanation abt the insensitive words written on a rock at a place he leased be sufficient to move on.”

Mr. Perry has been dogged the past two days by criticism — including some from presidential-primary rival Herman Cain — over a Sunday report in The Washington Post that the Texan regularly hosted gatherings at a West Texas hunting camp with the word “n–head” painted on a rock at the entrance to its acreage.

The Perry campaign said the offensive word on the rock was painted over in the 1980s, soon after the Perry family began leasing the hunting camp — a claim disputed by some camp visitors interviewed by The Post.

Ms. Brazile, who is black, lamented the heavy coverage as an absurd and counter-productive game of “gotcha” that does little to improve the lot of American blacks.

“Once you’re in one of these conversations, the topic becomes polarizing and we get into a game of gotcha. We can do better, but how?” Ms. Brazile wrote on one tweet and continuing her thought on another message with, “Now, the media is asking the White House to comment on the ‘N’ggerhead’ controversy. This is not about racial reconciliation, but division.”

Not that Ms. Brazile has given up her liberal inclinations, in fact she criticized the coverage as a distraction on progressive grounds.

Right after a flurry of five tweets about the Perry controversy, she wrote: “I prefer to discuss the President’s jobs bill, the wall street protestors and the upcoming march to reclaim the American Dream for all.”

 

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