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Jagger: Don't let Romney 'cut your hair'

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Rocker Mick Jagger closed out “Saturday Night Live’s” 37th season with some of the Rolling Stones’ most iconic hits, but the 68-year-old frontman also broke out something completely new: a bluesy, anti-Mitt Romney number called “Tea Party.”

In the performance, Mr. Jagger, accompanied by guitar legend Jeff Beck, sneers about “prayers” and warns listeners not to let Mr. Romney “cut your hair” — an apparent reference a much-talked-about incident from the presumptive Republican presidential nominee’s high school days that has become a huge talking point for Democratic pundits and advocates.

Here’s the verse:

Yeah, Mr. Romney, you know, he’s a mensch
But he always plays it straight up there
Yeah, Mr. Romney, he’s a hard workin’ man
And he always says his prayer
Yeah, but there’s one little thing about him
Don’t ever let him cut your hair.

 

The performance also included a clearly audible profanity that apparently went out unbleeped over the airwaves in most markets.

There’s no mention of President Obama in the song, but the anti-Romney references and the title — “Tea Party” — indicate the British rocker isn’t sitting on the fence this election.

Ironically, long before America’s anti-big government tea party came along, the Rolling Stones themselves were perhaps the world’s most famous tax protesters: In the early 1970s, the band fled to France to avoid England’s tax rates on the wealthy.

 

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About the Author
David Eldridge

David Eldridge

David Eldridge joined The Washington Times in 1999 and over the next seven years helped lead the paper's coverage of regional politics and government, Sept. 11, and the sniper attacks of 2002. In 2006, he was named managing editor of the paper's website. He came to The Times from the Telegraph in North Platte, Neb., where he served as executive ...

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