The Washington Times - October 4, 2012, 02:35PM

Attempting to regroup after a disappointing debate performance, President Obama’s campaign is casting GOP rival Mitt Romney as a “serial evader” whose ability to bend facts makes him unfit to be president.

The Obama campaign Thursday afternoon unveiled a new ad titled “Trust,” which takes Mr. Romney to task for running away from his tax-cut plans that a nonpartisan think tank has estimated would amount to $5 trillion dollars over 10 years.

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The ad — which will air in Colorado, Florida, Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada, Ohio and Virginia — is part of a counteroffensive to try to paint Mr. Romney as a “serial evader” whose strong debate performance Wednesday night won’t hold up over time, according to David Axelrod, Mr. Obama’s senior strategist.

Mr. Romney disputed the $5 trillion-dollar figure during Wednesday night’s debate, arguing that along with lowering taxes by 20 percent over their current level, his plan would get rid of deductions and tax loopholes and would also spur more economic growth, generating more tax revenue overall.

Mr. Obama disputes Mr. Romney’s scenario, arguing that the former Massachusetts governor is being purposefully vague about which deductions he would eliminate, and the inclusion of speculative economic growth in the scenario resembles past Republican supply-side economic plans that don’t play out in the real world.

After airing a clip showing Mr. Romney denying his plan would cost $5 trillion, the ad cuts to post-debate analysis from NBC’s Andrea Mitchell saying that the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center has said the tax plan would cost $4.8 trillion over 10 years.

“Why won’t Romney level with us about his tax plan, which gives the wealthy huge new tax breaks?” a narrator says in the ad. “Because according to experts, he’d have to raise taxes on the middle class — or increase the deficit to pay for it.”

Juxtaposing an image of Mr. Romney from last night’s debate and a photo of the Oval Office, the narrator goes on to say: “If we can’t trust him here … How could we ever trust him here?”