The Washington Times - June 25, 2013, 09:46AM

Former Sen. Scott P. Brown, Massachusetts Republican, said that he needed a respite from running for office and joked that the millions of dollars he would have had to raise to run in Tuesday’s special Senate election — as well as another campaign next year — “doesn’t compare to the big contract I got with Fox.”

“I needed a break,” Mr. Brown said on “Fox and Friends.” “I’ve been campaigning for almost 15 years between assessor, selectman, state rep, state Senate, U.S. Senate. The thought of running again, raising another $30 [or] $50 million and then the next day running again and raising another $50 to $70 million — you know, it doesn’t compare to the big contract I got with Fox, so what can I say, you know?” he said, laughing.

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After losing a race for a full term in November, Mr. Brown signed on as a Fox News contributor in February.

Mr. Brown scored a stunning victory in a January 2010 special election against Democrat Martha Coakley to fill the seat of the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy. In his unsuccessful campaign for a full six-year term in 2012 against Democrat Elizabeth Warren, Mr. Brown raised slightly more than $28 million, according to the Center for Responsive Politics, compared with Ms. Warren’s $42.5 million.

Many Republicans had hoped he would mount another challenge in the special election to fill the seat of John F. Kerry, who resigned to serve as secretary of state under President Obama. Democratic Rep. Edward J. Markey appears to be in a good position to defeat Republican Gabriel Gomez, a former Navy SEAL, in the special election.

Low-turnout elections can often produce unpredictable results, as was the case in 2010, and turnout is expected to be approximately 37 percent in Tuesday’s election — which would be the lowest participation rate in a Massachusetts Senate race in modern history, Secretary of State William Galvin said.

In the Jan. 2010 special election, more than 2.25 million votes were cast. Mr. Galvin is predicting no more than 1.6 million on Tuesday, USA Today reported.