The Washington Times - June 4, 2013, 12:26PM

Roads and bridges aren’t the only parts of the nation’s infrastructure in desperate need of repair.

A new federal government report out Tuesday shows that much of the nation’s drinking water infrastructure “has reached or is approaching the end of its useful life” and that nearly $400 billion is needed to fix it.

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The survey, released every four years by the Environmental Protection Agency, examined more than 3,000 public drinking water systems across the U.S. It found that many of those systems — some of which are 50 years old or older — need massive upgrades before 2030.

“The survey EPA released today shows that the nation’s water systems have entered a rehabilitation-and-replacement era in which much of the existing infrastructure has reached or is approaching the end of its useful life,” said Bob Perciasepe, EPA’s acting administrator. “This is a major issue that must be addressed so that American families continue to have the access they need to clean and healthy water sources.”

Specifically, the study found that: $247.5 billion is needed to replace or repair aging water distribution lines; nearly $73 billion must be put into treatment systems; it would take about $40 billion to adequately rehabilitate water storage reservoirs; and more than $20 billion is needed to construct or fix intake structures and wells.