The Washington Times - June 26, 2013, 12:20PM

“Today’s ruling is a victory of conservative principles and admonishment of government overreach,” says Gregory T. Angelo, executive director of the Log Cabin Republicans, the nation’s largest Republican organization for gay conservatives and their allies, following the U.S. Supreme Court’s concurrent rulings on the Federal Defense of Marriage Act and Proposition 8.

“Civil marriage strengthens families, supports stability, and allows greater opportunity for couples to live without the crutch of government assistance, and now with Section 3 of DOMA rightly relegated to the dustbin of history, same-sex couples in civil marriage partnerships in those states that allow it can engage in the full spectrum of federal rights previously denied them,” Mr. Angelo continues.

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“Now the fight continues in the states, and Log Cabin Republicans will continue to be on the front lines to take the conservative case for marriage to Republicans across the nation. History is on our side, and the wind is at our backs. We’re not done yet - not by a long shot,” he adds.

And some thoughts on it all from the Judicial Crisis Network’s Carrie Severino:

On DOMA:

“The majority’s reasoning today, as Justice Scalia put it, ‘is an assertion of judicial supremacy over the people’s representatives in Congress.’ However, there is a very thin silver lining; we are all federalists now. Just thirty years ago it would have been wild to suggest that a solid majority of the justices, in two major cases concerning a heated cultural issue, would affirm the idea that the most important decisions about social policy in this country should be made at the state level, by the people and their elected officials,” Ms. Severino says.

“The bottom line is that same-sex marriage advocates ran to the Supreme Court hoping the justices would invent a nationwide right to gay marriage, and they lost. Instead, the justices have embraced principles of federalism and said that this issue will be decided by the people and their elected representatives at the state level.”

And on Prop 8:

“While this result is certainly disappointing for those who hoped for a final ruling today, it affirms the fundamental constitutional principle of limited government - including the limited authority of the courts to decide cases. The bottom line is that same-sex marriage advocates ran to the Supreme Court hoping the justices would invent a nationwide right to gay marriage, and they lost,” she says.

This contentious policy issue is one that properly should be decided at the local level by the people and their elected officials, not by five unelected judges,” Ms. Severino concludes.