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BOOK REVIEW: ‘Hot Dogs and Cocktails’

If it is not quite commonplace for British monarchs to visit the United States these days, it is hard for anyone who hasn’t been collecting Social Security for some time to grasp just how big a deal it was when King George VI and his Queen Consort visited the United States in 1939.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Crazy Town: the Rob Ford Story’

As a Canadian contributor to The Washington Times, I’ve occasionally included analyses of my country’s history and politics. It provides American readers with a small window into the Great White North.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘The Temporary Gentleman’

Jack McNulty, an Irishman commissioned in the British Army during World War II and thus “a temporary gentleman,” was standing on the deck of the ship en route to British Africa to counter the forces of Vichy France.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘America’s Mistress’

If Eartha Kitt is remembered at all today, it is either because of her appearances as Catwoman on the ultra-campy 1960s “Batman” TV series, or (by political junkies) because she made Lady Bird Johnson teary after a luncheon at the White House by delivering a rambling, alcohol-fueled rant against President Lyndon Johnson’s Vietnam policies.

Nixon Book

Ex-aide to John Dean trashes Watergate figure’s book

According to John Dean’s new book, “The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It,” President Nixon knew a lot more about Watergate a lot sooner than he ever admitted. However, the question one should ask before plowing through Mr. Dean’s 746-page “definitive” history is, “What difference, at this point, does it make?”

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Good Hunting: An American Spymaster’s Story’

When an expert such as Jack Devine, a three-decades-plus veteran of the CIA’s Clandestine Service, warns about myriad world troubles stretching into the foreseeable future, serious citizens should take heed — and those now running the agency, both in-house and as elected officials, should give “Good Hunting” a careful read in light of what can be done to protect the country.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Blood Brotherhoods’

If, like this reviewer, you enjoyed reading English author John Dickie’s “Delizia!” an appropriately delicious and entertaining history of Italian cuisine, his massive new book, “Blood Brotherhoods,” may come as something of a surprise.

Related Articles

BOOK REVIEW: 'Russian Roulette'

In November 1917, soon after his Bolshevik faction seized control of Russia, Lenin called on the "oppressed masses" of Asia to follow Russia's example and throw off colonial rule.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Zhivago Affair'

During the 1950s, the American and Soviet governments agreed on very little, but they shared a charming faith in the power of literature — novels especially — to influence the hearts and minds of readers.

BOOK REVIEW: 'War!: What Is It Good For?"

Now comes Ian Morris with humor and a swath of historical data to argue that the 15,000 years of bloody warfare that have killed countless millions have actually made us safer, wealthier and longer-lived.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Arsonist'

The main characters of Sue Miller's new novel, "The Arsonist," have all recently settled in the New Hampshire village of Pomeroy. To Frankie Rowley, it isn't an entirely new place because she spent summers on the family farm her parents Sylvia and Alfie inherited.

BOOK REVIEW: 'How Paris Became Paris'

Far more than a great line from a great movie, "We'll always have Paris" captures what this magical city means to its visitors, especially those romantically inclined.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Spies, Patriots, and Traitors'

During one phase of his career as a senior case officer in the CIA's National Clandestine Service, Kenneth Daigler was tasked with creating a suite of conference rooms for use by foreign intelligence liaison visitors to the headquarters complex.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Blue-Eyed Boy'

Some nurses called him "The Burn" after he was hideously wounded in a landmine explosion in Vietnam four decades ago.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Faithless Execution'

As assistant United States attorney for the Southern District of New York, Andrew McCarthy earned a reputation as a well-prepared, effective prosecutor. He is best known for prosecuting — and putting in prison — Sheik Omar Abdel Rahman and 11 others for the 1993 truck bombing of the World Trade Center.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Northranger Abbey'

There is no question that Val McDermid is an excellent mystery writer. She has riveted many readers over the years with her chilling accounts of serial killers. However, she has little in common with Jane Austen as a woman or as a writer, and it is difficult to understand why she chose to turn Austen's classic, "Northanger Abbey," into an adolescent romp peppered with 21st-century teenage jargon.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Stand Up Straight and Sing'

Jessye Norman is not exactly your typical diva. To begin with, she graduated not from Juilliard or Curtis, but from Howard University, and proudly maintains her ties there.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Fourth Revolution'

"The Fourth Revolution" is about government and ideas. John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge, senior editors at The Economist, posit that ''the western state has been through three-and-a-half great revolutions in modern times."