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BOOK REVIEW: ‘A World Elsewhere’

This is one of those books that operates on two distinct levels. On the one hand, it is the story of Aimee Ellis, a young American woman who falls in love with and marries Heinrich von Hoyningen-Huene, a Baltic aristocrat, goes to live in pre-Hitler Germany and stays there for the next two tumultuous decades.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘The Long Way Home’

In this series of haunting mysteries built around the enchanting community of Three Pines and focused on the fascinating character of Armand Gamache, a police inspector with panache, the place sometimes transcends the plot.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Conservative Internationalism’

After a full century’s steady string of wars, each related to the others as in a continuing narrative, one political scientist has undertaken to categorize them and their warrior practitioners.

Bill Cosby    Associated Press photo

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Cosby: His Life and Times’

After reading Mark Whitaker’s engrossing and comprehensive account of Bill Cosby’s action-packed life, “raconteur par excellence” is probably the best way to describe the enduring laugh meister, athlete, TV star, author, Jell-O pitchman, producer, teacher and America’s quintessential father.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Arthur Ashe’

The flags in Richmond, Va., flew at half-staff on Feb. 9, 1993, as crowds of residents, black and white, lined the streets to pay their final respects to one of the city’s most famous sons, tennis professional Arthur Ashe.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Before the First Shots’

Retired Marine Corps Gen. Tony Zinni is one of the most respected and experienced military officers that the United States has produced in recent memory. He offers some reflections in “Before the First Shots Are Fired,” his latest book, on the sad state of American strategy and what might be done to fix it.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘The Liar’s Wife’

The artful relationships among the four novellas collected in Mary Gordon’s “The Liar’s Wife” make this volume way more than the sum of its parts.

Related Articles

BOOK REVIEW: 'Agent Storm'

In the 1949 book "The God That Failed: A Confession," prominent ex-communist intellectuals recounted their disillusionment with and abandonment of communism. What also made that book noteworthy was its running concept of "Kronstadt" as the defining moment in which these ex-communists decided not merely to leave the Communist Party, but to actively oppose it as anti-communists.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Liar Temptress Soldier Spy'

The title tells all, almost. In "Liar Temptress Soldier Spy," Karen Abbott stitches together a patchwork narrative as complex as a pieced quilt, combining the colorful, unrelated tales of four women who fought in the Civil War as surely as Lee and Grant, albeit in sub rosa roles.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Close Call: A Liz Carlyle Novel'

Counterterrorism is the espionage theme of the day, and Stella Rimington draws on years of experience as chief of Britain's MI5 in this tightly drawn thriller.

BOOK REVIEW: 'One Million Steps: A Marine Platoon at War'

Perhaps the definitive account of Marine Corps infantry in combat is Eugene Sledge's "With the Old Breed," a report of his experiences in the final brutal island battles of World War II in the Pacific as a member of the Third Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment (3/5).

BOOK REVIEW: 'A Race for the Future'

When President Obama decided for purely political reasons to put off all action on immigration reform until after the November elections, Rep. Luis V. Gutierrez, Illinois Democrat, an activist on immigration policy and no friend of conservatives, pointed out that the president was "playing it safe," fearful of losing the Senate.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Prime Minister's Ironing Board and Other State Secrets'

We owe this delightful political potpourri to the famous — or infamous, depending on your perspective — "30-year-old" British rule, which for much of the past century kept locked up even the most innocuous government documents for three full decades.

Timeless

BOOK REVIEW: 'Timeless: Love, Morgenthau and Me'

Although Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Lucinda Franks was born long before the term "too much information" became a cliche, this autobiographical hurtle through her life and marriage shows her to be a veritable personification of the phenomenon.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Impossible Exile'

Is it possible to feel a deep sense of loss for something that never was? Millions of white Southerners, most of whose ancestors led hardscrabble lives as small farmers, day laborers or petty tradesmen, still wax sentimental about a glamorous, "lost" antebellum world that existed mainly within the covers of Margaret Mitchell's "Gone with the Wind."

BOOK REVIEW: 'Vertigo 42'

There is Aghast the goat, Aggrieved the horse and Aggro the dog, all property of Melrose Plant, the former Lord Ardry, who is a member of an exclusive London club called Borings and also a friend of Inspector Richard Jury of Scotland Yard — and, of course, there are murders.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Please Stop Helping Us'

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. famously said we are a "nation of cowards" when it comes to discussing race. Jason Riley is not one of them.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Hot Dogs and Cocktails'

If it is not quite commonplace for British monarchs to visit the United States these days, it is hard for anyone who hasn't been collecting Social Security for some time to grasp just how big a deal it was when King George VI and his Queen Consort visited the United States in 1939.