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BOOK REVIEW: ‘Russian Roulette’

In November 1917, soon after his Bolshevik faction seized control of Russia, Lenin called on the “oppressed masses” of Asia to follow Russia’s example and throw off colonial rule.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘The Zhivago Affair’

During the 1950s, the American and Soviet governments agreed on very little, but they shared a charming faith in the power of literature — novels especially — to influence the hearts and minds of readers.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘War!: What Is It Good For?”

Now comes Ian Morris with humor and a swath of historical data to argue that the 15,000 years of bloody warfare that have killed countless millions have actually made us safer, wealthier and longer-lived.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘The Arsonist’

The main characters of Sue Miller’s new novel, “The Arsonist,” have all recently settled in the New Hampshire village of Pomeroy. To Frankie Rowley, it isn’t an entirely new place because she spent summers on the family farm her parents Sylvia and Alfie inherited.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘How Paris Became Paris’

Far more than a great line from a great movie, “We’ll always have Paris” captures what this magical city means to its visitors, especially those romantically inclined.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Spies, Patriots, and Traitors’

During one phase of his career as a senior case officer in the CIA’s National Clandestine Service, Kenneth Daigler was tasked with creating a suite of conference rooms for use by foreign intelligence liaison visitors to the headquarters complex.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Blue-Eyed Boy’

Some nurses called him “The Burn” after he was hideously wounded in a landmine explosion in Vietnam four decades ago.

Related Articles

BOOK REVIEW: 'Stand Up Straight and Sing'

Jessye Norman is not exactly your typical diva. To begin with, she graduated not from Juilliard or Curtis, but from Howard University, and proudly maintains her ties there.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Fourth Revolution'

"The Fourth Revolution" is about government and ideas. John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge, senior editors at The Economist, posit that ''the western state has been through three-and-a-half great revolutions in modern times."

BOOK REVIEW: 'A Very Principled Boy'

Behind a carefully tended patrician facade, OSS officer Duncan Lee hid secrets that could have put him either in prison or on the gallows. While working as a trusted aide to OSS director William Donovan, he spied for the Soviet Union.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Clinton, Inc.'

Daniel Halper, online editor of The Weekly Standard, opens "Clinton, Inc." with a quote from F. Scott Fitzgerald's "Great Gatsby": "They were careless people, Tom and Daisy — they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made."

BOOK REVIEW: 'Sting of the Drone'

Just as all healthy food doesn't taste like weeds, and dental appointments don't always hurt, no law forbids a techno-thriller from being a novel of ideas.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Murder of the Middle Class'

Within these pages, a highly energetic, angry (not without reason) ambitious man known worldwide as a "capitalist evangelist" argues that middle-class America is victimized by a "criminal conspiracy."

BOOK REVIEW: 'Brazil: The Fortunes of War'

Readers of Neill Lochery's book on neutral Lisbon seething with intrigue during World War II will know his flair for summoning up the atmosphere of a particular point in time and location as a fascinating sidelight into a larger topic.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Alex's Wake'

The shameful tale of the German liner St. Louis, which sailed the seas in 1939 with its Jewish refugee passengers in search of safe harbor, has been told many times — and why not?

BOOK REVIEW: 'Lovers at the Chameleon Club'

Paris in the 1930s was rife with "[u]nemployment, inflation, mass bankruptcy, immigration, a crushing national debt, an increasing tax roll, and a diminishing tax base, political scandal, poverty, a shrinking middle class — and the high jinks, over the border, of [its] neighbor, Mr. Hitler."

BOOK REVIEW: 'That Summer in Paris'

Ever since I read "A Moveable Feast," Ernest Hemingway's marvelously evocative memoir of his salad days in 1920s Paris, I have known just how special it was for him and his generation of American writers