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BOOK REVIEW: ‘Knife Fights’

Writing a book about formulating military doctrine for a general audience is no easy task, but Army Lt. Col. John Nagl (retired) has mastered the challenge.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘The Handsome Man’s De Luxe Cafe’

In this treat of a book there are talking shoes advising their wearer on what not to eat and there is the boundless philosophizing of Mma Precious Ramotswe, owner of the No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency of Botswana.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Why We Bite the Invisible Hand’

If you go to a bookstore, you’ll find an abundance of books deploring the very nature of capitalism. Hence, it’s a pleasure to find one author who will buck the trend and present the flawed logic of the anti-capitalists.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘The ‘40s: The Story of a Decade’

If the 1940s gave the United States its “Greatest Generation,” then it would seem from this collection that it also gave The New Yorker magazine its greatest decade.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘The Invisible Front’

In his superb new book, “The Invisible Front,” Yochi Dreazen paints a deeply disturbing portrait of the overstretched United States Army, downsizing in Afghanistan while deploying against the latest threats of the Islamic State and Ebola.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘World Order’

In “World Order,” Henry Kissinger writes, “Success in such an effort will require an approach that respects both the multifariousness of the human condition and the ingrained human quest for freedom.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Blood on the Water’

Almost 200 men, women and children die when a bomb explodes on the pleasure boat Princess Mary as it floats down the Thames on a summer evening in 19th-century London.

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BOOK REVIEW: 'Killing Patton'

KILLING PATTON: THE STRANGE DEATH OF WORLD WAR II'S MOST AUDACIOUS GENERAL

BOOK REVIEW: 'Horton and the Kwuggerbug and More Lost Stories'

A book that captures a child's love, devotion and imagination is a prized possession, indeed. If this book can transcend generations and changing attitudes, it should be regarded as legendary.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Narrow Road to the Deep North'

A complex work of special genius, "The Narrow Road to the Deep North" traces a wonderful variety of human motives: love, agony, hope, ecstasy, torture, wisdom, conceit, generosity, loneliness, loss.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Secret Place'

It is as surreal as it is secret, the teenage world portrayed here in the most chilling terms. The question of who murdered handsome Chris Harper becomes far less intriguing than the journey through psychological darkness to find out who did it and why.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Daphne du Maurier and Her Sisters'

This study of the three du Maurier sisters is part of a trend that involves suggesting, with varying degrees of subtlety, that the lesser-known siblings of superstars are the equals, or in some respect even the superior, in talent.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Closer'

In the book of New York Yankees lore, a special chapter will always be reserved for Mariano Rivera.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Conservative Internationalism'

After a full century's steady string of wars, each related to the others as in a continuing narrative, one political scientist has undertaken to categorize them and their warrior practitioners.

BOOK REVIEW: 'A World Elsewhere'

This is one of those books that operates on two distinct levels. On the one hand, it is the story of Aimee Ellis, a young American woman who falls in love with and marries Heinrich von Hoyningen-Huene, a Baltic aristocrat, goes to live in pre-Hitler Germany and stays there for the next two tumultuous decades.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Long Way Home'

In this series of haunting mysteries built around the enchanting community of Three Pines and focused on the fascinating character of Armand Gamache, a police inspector with panache, the place sometimes transcends the plot.

Bill Cosby    Associated Press photo

BOOK REVIEW: 'Cosby: His Life and Times'

After reading Mark Whitaker's engrossing and comprehensive account of Bill Cosby's action-packed life, "raconteur par excellence" is probably the best way to describe the enduring laugh meister, athlete, TV star, author, Jell-O pitchman, producer, teacher and America's quintessential father.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Arthur Ashe'

The flags in Richmond, Va., flew at half-staff on Feb. 9, 1993, as crowds of residents, black and white, lined the streets to pay their final respects to one of the city's most famous sons, tennis professional Arthur Ashe.