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BOOK REVIEW: ‘The Virgin Way’

How do you institutionalize genius? Although this question is familiar to students of American government and military science, it is particularly elusive in business, where corporate leadership is often a contradiction in terms

BOOK REVIEW: ‘The Shifts and the Shocks’

Six years after the global financial crisis, it still remains unclear whether we have the right economic policies to avert the next crisis, let alone the right policies to help an economy currently in “secular stagnation.”

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Agent Storm’

In the 1949 book “The God That Failed: A Confession,” prominent ex-communist intellectuals recounted their disillusionment with and abandonment of communism. What also made that book noteworthy was its running concept of “Kronstadt” as the defining moment in which these ex-communists decided not merely to leave the Communist Party, but to actively oppose it as anti-communists.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Liar Temptress Soldier Spy’

The title tells all, almost. In “Liar Temptress Soldier Spy,” Karen Abbott stitches together a patchwork narrative as complex as a pieced quilt, combining the colorful, unrelated tales of four women who fought in the Civil War as surely as Lee and Grant, albeit in sub rosa roles.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Close Call: A Liz Carlyle Novel’

Counterterrorism is the espionage theme of the day, and Stella Rimington draws on years of experience as chief of Britain’s MI5 in this tightly drawn thriller.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘One Million Steps: A Marine Platoon at War’

Perhaps the definitive account of Marine Corps infantry in combat is Eugene Sledge’s “With the Old Breed,” a report of his experiences in the final brutal island battles of World War II in the Pacific as a member of the Third Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment (3/5).

BOOK REVIEW: ‘A Race for the Future’

When President Obama decided for purely political reasons to put off all action on immigration reform until after the November elections, Rep. Luis V. Gutierrez, Illinois Democrat, an activist on immigration policy and no friend of conservatives, pointed out that the president was “playing it safe,” fearful of losing the Senate.

Related Articles

BOOK REVIEW: 'Vertigo 42'

There is Aghast the goat, Aggrieved the horse and Aggro the dog, all property of Melrose Plant, the former Lord Ardry, who is a member of an exclusive London club called Borings and also a friend of Inspector Richard Jury of Scotland Yard — and, of course, there are murders.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Impossible Exile'

Is it possible to feel a deep sense of loss for something that never was? Millions of white Southerners, most of whose ancestors led hardscrabble lives as small farmers, day laborers or petty tradesmen, still wax sentimental about a glamorous, "lost" antebellum world that existed mainly within the covers of Margaret Mitchell's "Gone with the Wind."

BOOK REVIEW: 'Please Stop Helping Us'

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. famously said we are a "nation of cowards" when it comes to discussing race. Jason Riley is not one of them.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Hot Dogs and Cocktails'

If it is not quite commonplace for British monarchs to visit the United States these days, it is hard for anyone who hasn't been collecting Social Security for some time to grasp just how big a deal it was when King George VI and his Queen Consort visited the United States in 1939.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Crazy Town: the Rob Ford Story'

As a Canadian contributor to The Washington Times, I've occasionally included analyses of my country's history and politics. It provides American readers with a small window into the Great White North.

BOOK REVIEW: 'America's Mistress'

If Eartha Kitt is remembered at all today, it is either because of her appearances as Catwoman on the ultra-campy 1960s "Batman" TV series, or (by political junkies) because she made Lady Bird Johnson teary after a luncheon at the White House by delivering a rambling, alcohol-fueled rant against President Lyndon Johnson's Vietnam policies.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Temporary Gentleman'

Jack McNulty, an Irishman commissioned in the British Army during World War II and thus "a temporary gentleman," was standing on the deck of the ship en route to British Africa to counter the forces of Vichy France.

Nixon Book

Ex-aide to John Dean trashes Watergate figure's book

According to John Dean's new book, "The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It," President Nixon knew a lot more about Watergate a lot sooner than he ever admitted. However, the question one should ask before plowing through Mr. Dean's 746-page "definitive" history is, "What difference, at this point, does it make?"

BOOK REVIEW: 'Good Hunting: An American Spymaster's Story'

When an expert such as Jack Devine, a three-decades-plus veteran of the CIA's Clandestine Service, warns about myriad world troubles stretching into the foreseeable future, serious citizens should take heed — and those now running the agency, both in-house and as elected officials, should give "Good Hunting" a careful read in light of what can be done to protect the country.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Blood Brotherhoods'

If, like this reviewer, you enjoyed reading English author John Dickie's "Delizia!" an appropriately delicious and entertaining history of Italian cuisine, his massive new book, "Blood Brotherhoods," may come as something of a surprise.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Care and Management of Lies'

She wrote letters that transported men living in the shadow of death in the French trenches to the fragrance of a kitchen in Kent.