Skip to content

Books

Featured Articles

Where all the political bodies are buried

Sophisticated cynicism is the coin of the realm for distinguished British journalists like Andrew Marr, who has a reputation as an editor, a BBC political commentator and a historian. This is a dark and shining example of his talent as a satirist.

‘And now for something completely different’

For most diehard Monty Python fans, the excitement generated at the idea of John Cleese writing an autobiography must have been enormous. After the announcement of the book’s release, the speculation must have included thoughts such as:

The brothers who taught the world how to fly

At exactly 10:35 a.m. on Dec. 17, 1903, at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, Orville Wright slipped the rope restraining the Flyer and started down the track. At the end of the track the Flyer lifted into the air.

The spying sins of the father

Of the American intelligence and military officers who spied for the Soviet Union and successor Russia, who deserves the most scorn for odious conduct? Topping any list would be Aldrich Ames of the CIA, whose treachery cost the lives of sources working for the United States, followed closely by Robert Hanssen of the FBI, who gave the KGB the bureau’s “game plan” for tracking spies.

Justice is blind

I have followed China’s brutal one-child policy from its inception in 1979. Living in China at the time, I saw how poor village women were being arrested, detained and tortured — forced to undergo sterilizations and even abortions — all in the name of controlling population growth. I left China with their cries for help ringing in my ears.

When a sensitive contract killer goes to Oslo

A professional hit man is a challenging topic for a crime writer, especially one as steeped in gore as Norwegian author Jo Nesbo. Yet the most intriguing kind of hit man usually possesses a cold charm perhaps as a result of a way of life that involves killing on contract.

Rebels without a cause

As a Marine Corps second lieutenant in 1971, the first article I wrote for the Marine Corps Gazette addressed the real possibility of an urban civil war in which the military might be called on to fight radical elements of my own generation who were advocating and actively working for the violent overthrow of the United States government.

Related Articles

Kirsten Powers' new book explores the role of the Left in silencing those who disagree with them. (Regnery Publishing)

Kirsten Powers: 'How the left is killing free speech' and demonizing conservatives

- The Washington Times

There's much talk about free speech, and the right to it. Now comes a major book explaining who and what is eroding this most basic tenet. Out Monday, it's "The Silencing: How the Left is Killing Free Speech" by Kirsten Powers, a lifelong liberal and daughter of a feminist who converted to Christianity as an adult and is now a frequent contributor to Fox News.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Operation Nemesis: The Assassination Plot That Avenged the Armenian Genocide'

Vengeance is born when justice dies. "Operation Nemesis" is the gripping tale of how a small, ruthlessly determined group of Armenians hunted down the architects of the Ottoman Empire's World War I program of organized mass murder, specifically intended to eliminate a people, the Armenians, who had lived in Anatolia and other parts of the Ottoman Empire for thousands of years.

Following the trajectory of American song

If you love music, especially if you've been following its twists and turns and ever-changing styles all through your life, you will want to read "The B-Side: The Death of Tin Pan Alley and the Rebirth of the Great American Song."

An artist of many parts

Jackson Pollock didn't begin his meteoric career by dripping house paint on tarpaulins any more than Piet Mondrian started out painting white and colored spaces within black boundaries. They had to discover their abstract genres after years of making realistic pictures and learning from there.

Chasing a narrow ideal of beauty

"It's not my fault. So you can't blame me." No disclaimer is more suspect than this, the first line of Toni Morrison's new novel "God Help the Child." It's the mantra of Sweetness, the light-skinned black mother of a midnight-dark daughter. "She embarrassed me," she explains. She fantasized about killing her, but decided instead to be "strict, very strict."

Blaming America for the Cold War

Should I feign surprise? Decades after communism collapsed into rubble, the blame-America crowd — ah, those "intellectuals" — remains determined to blame the Cold War on President Harry S. Truman and British Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill.

What makes America exceptional

"Seminal" is not a word that fits many books, but it fits this one, for "American Beliefs" is both creative and original. It rests on a simple conclusion: This nation became one different from all others because of the nature of its earliest arrivals from Europe.

Fishing, hiking, sin and mystery

Lascivious old men of the world, unite. You have a new champion. Ever since becoming as well-known to AARP and Social Security as he is to his many readers, 77-year-old Jim Harrison, one of the finest American writers of the last half-century, has been featuring male protagonists who are past maturity, or, to be downright factual, old. And yet their amatory accomplishments are the stuff of young men's dreams.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Marijuana: The Unbiased Truth About the World's Most Popular Weed'

After decades of curiosity, I have finally found a source of impartial, science-based information that answers many of the questions that those of us not deranged by some drug of choice can use to decide whether marijuana is a serious societal menace or whether there might be some genuine benefits to that smelly weed.