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BOOK REVIEW: ‘Killer, Come Hither’

Louis Begley is no Mickey Spillane, nor is his hero, Jack Dana, a Mike Hammer, that is, until Jack meets and kills his foe with all the finesse of the most hard-boiled detective.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Hokusai’

Between the 17th and 19th centuries, ukiyo-e was one of the most influential artistic styles in Japan. Composed of woodblock prints and traditional painting, typical scenes included historical events, folk stories, beautiful women and the rigors of daily life.

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'The Algerian'

- The Washington Times

"The Algerian," an Independent production written, directed and produced by Giovanni Zelko is a film with a message, a compelling story and a talented if unknown cast. In that sense it like most Independent productions or, as they're known in the industry, "Indies." Like their grownup, big budget cousins, some of them are good and some aren't worth watching.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Bennington Girls are Easy'

"Bennington Girls Are Easy" has a title and cover that scream "chick-lit," but author Charlotte Silver has written a novel that is more than that. Her chicks, Cassandra Puffin and Sylvie Furst, start out as excited, ditzy, newly minted alums of Bennington College trying to make it in New York.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Triumph of the Ecunnau-Nuxulgee'

Until my wife put a stop to it, I used to jibe at dinner-table advocates of the "all white people are racists" school of history by recalling that long before the first African slaves were sold in Jamestown in 1619, our Indian brothers were skilled both as slave takers and sellers of tribal captives.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Muse'

When a writer who has spent his entire life in the publishing business sits down to write his first novel, what does he write about? Well, that was easy -- publishing, of course.

BOOK REVIEW: 'A Murder of Magpies'

Anyone who has tried to write a book will relish this exuberant satire on the publishing business as portrayed by Sam Clair, an editor who has no illusions about her business.