Skip to content

Books

Featured Articles

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Hokusai’

Between the 17th and 19th centuries, ukiyo-e was one of the most influential artistic styles in Japan. Composed of woodblock prints and traditional painting, typical scenes included historical events, folk stories, beautiful women and the rigors of daily life.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Being Nixon: A Man Divided’

Slowly but surely, the ranks of the rabid Nixon haters are thinning, to be replaced by more thoughtful and temperate writers and historians, free from the fierce ideological biases of the last century, able to look at Richard Nixon’s accomplishments as well as his failures, and to examine the man himself without the intense personal rancor of an earlier ideological era.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘The Novel Habits of Happiness’

Isabel Dalhousie philosophizes the way some people drink. There is nothing that she won’t contemplate, analyze or nitpick, from meerkats in the zoo to the difference between a good submarine (the crew doesn’t swear or drink) and a bad submarine which of course must be nuclear.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Bennington Girls are Easy’

“Bennington Girls Are Easy” has a title and cover that scream “chick-lit,” but author Charlotte Silver has written a novel that is more than that. Her chicks, Cassandra Puffin and Sylvie Furst, start out as excited, ditzy, newly minted alums of Bennington College trying to make it in New York.

Related Articles

BOOK REVIEW: 'Muse'

When a writer who has spent his entire life in the publishing business sits down to write his first novel, what does he write about? Well, that was easy -- publishing, of course.

BOOK REVIEW: 'A Murder of Magpies'

Anyone who has tried to write a book will relish this exuberant satire on the publishing business as portrayed by Sam Clair, an editor who has no illusions about her business.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Churchill and the Generals'

Even if you've read umpteen books about Winston Churchill and even if you think you already know enough about the wartime leader's relationship with his generals, you may still want to read this book by a well-known British military historian.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Goebbels: A Biography'

Hannah Arendt had Adolf Eichmann in mind when she coined the term "Banality of Evil," but she might as well have been thinking of Joseph Goebbels.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Speechwriter: A Brief Education in Politics'

From 2007 to 2010, Barton Swaim worked as a writer for Mark Sanford, the South Carolina governor who set out to hike the Appalachian Trail, ended up in Argentina where he found romance, and in the process gave the media the kind of story they're best at.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Great Leader and the Fighter Pilot'

In September 1953, bold headlines dominated American newspapers. "Mystery Red MIG Lands Near Seoul," trumpeted the San Francisco Chronicle. The North Korean pilot, Lt. No Kum Suk, aged 21, was so disgusted with the totalitarian state shaped by the Soviet-installed dictator Kim Il Sung that he broke off a training flight to land near Seoul, the South Korean capital.