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  • BOOK REVIEW: 'The Murder of the Middle Class'

    By Wes Vernon - Special to The Washington Times

    Within these pages, a highly energetic, angry (not without reason) ambitious man known worldwide as a “capitalist evangelist” argues that middle-class America is victimized by a “criminal conspiracy.” Published July 31, 2014 Comments

  • BOOK REVIEW: ‘Brazil: The Fortunes of War’

    By Martin Rubin - Special to The Washington Times

    Readers of Neill Lochery’s book on neutral Lisbon seething with intrigue during World War II will know his flair for summoning up the atmosphere of a particular point in time and location as a fascinating sidelight into a larger topic. Published July 31, 2014 Comments

  • BOOK REVIEW: ‘Alex’s Wake’

    By Martin Rubin - Special to The Washington Times

    The shameful tale of the German liner St. Louis, which sailed the seas in 1939 with its Jewish refugee passengers in search of safe harbor, has been told many times — and why not? Published July 29, 2014 Comments

  • BOOK REVIEW: ‘Assault and Flattery’

    By Kate Obenshain - Special to The Washington Times

    Think the “War on Women” meme is passe? Run its course? Think again. Published July 28, 2014 Comments

  • BOOK REVIEW: ‘Lovers at the Chameleon Club’

    By Corinna Lothar - Special to The Washington Times

    Paris in the 1930s was rife with “[u]nemployment, inflation, mass bankruptcy, immigration, a crushing national debt, an increasing tax roll, and a diminishing tax base, political scandal, poverty, a shrinking middle class — and the high jinks, over the border, of [its] neighbor, Mr. Hitler.” Published July 25, 2014 Comments

  • BOOK REVIEW: ‘That Summer in Paris’

    By Martin Rubin - Special to The Washington Times

    Ever since I read “A Moveable Feast,” Ernest Hemingway’s marvelously evocative memoir of his salad days in 1920s Paris, I have known just how special it was for him and his generation of American writers Published July 24, 2014 Comments

  • BOOK REVIEW: ‘A Spy Among Friends’

    By Muriel Dobbin - Special to The Washington Times

    There is no question that Kim Philby was the most legendary spy of World War II, carving a trail of deception and death in the world of espionage. Published July 23, 2014 Comments

Recent Articles
  • BOOK REVIEW: 'John Quincy Adams'

    By Alec Rogers - Special to The Washington Times

    When Secretary of State John F. Kerry declared the Monroe Doctrine, a pillar of U.S. foreign policy in name if not strict practice for nearly two centuries, officially a dead letter, he noted that it bore the name of the president who proclaimed it. Published July 10, 2014

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'The Greatest Comeback'

    By John R. Coyne Jr. - Special to The Washington Times

    In the 1960s, the country was running out of control — race riots, cities burning, assassinations, campus anarchy. Published July 8, 2014

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'Twilight of Abundance'

    By Wes Vernon - Special to The Washington Times

    Since the attack of Sept. 11, 2001, and the market crash of 2008, Americans have fewer reasons to brush aside warnings such as those in the title of this book. Published July 8, 2014

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'The Book of Unknown Americans'

    By Claire Hopley - Special to The Washington Times

    The unknowns who Cristina Henriquez pictures in her novel, "The Book of Unknown Americans," are those who come from south of the United States border: the Spanish-speaking people of Central and South America. Published July 7, 2014

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'Trading With the Enemy'

    By Joseph C. Goulden - Special to The Washington Times

    One of the seldom-discussed scandals of the American Civil War was the rapacity of Northern businessmen, who imported millions of bales of cotton from the Confederacy, then used the proceeds to buy arms. Published July 7, 2014

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'Elihu Yale'

    By Martin Rubin - Special to The Washington Times

    How many people would identify Yale University with far-off Wales and much further-off Madras (now Chennai) on the East coast of India? Published July 2, 2014

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'The Good Spy'

    By Joseph C. Goulden - Special to The Washinton Times

    One task of an intelligence service is the cultivation of back-channel contacts with an adversary who, for whatever reason, cannot be publicly recognized. Such was the specialty of Robert Ames, one of the more remarkable case officers in CIA history. Published July 1, 2014

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'James Madison: A Life Reconsidered'

    By Michael Taube - Special to The Washington Times

    James Madison, the fourth U.S. president, has been called the "Father of the Constitution" and the "Father of the Bill of Rights" by some historians. Published June 29, 2014

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'The Axe Factor'

    By Muriel Dobbin - Special to The Washington Times

    Few mysteries offer advice on how to kill someone with an ax and tidily dissect the remains, with the narrator bragging: "I have graduated from the writer of death to the taker of life." Published June 27, 2014

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'Enduring Courage'

    By Philip Kopper - Special to The Washington Times

    Anyone who was a boy in 1945 remembers this personification of sang froid: Movie actor Fred MacMurray, adrift in a life raft, sits motionless as a seabird perches on his head, then carefully reaches up to grab the bird for his starved companions' first food in weeks. Published June 26, 2014

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'The River'

    By Kenneth V. Blanchard - Special to The Washington Times

    Ray Keating's latest novel, "The River," takes you on an intriguing summer ride from Langley to the Vatican with Stephen Grant, a former CIA agent who leaves his intelligence career behind and becomes a pastor of St. Mary's Lutheran Church on East Long Island. Published June 25, 2014

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'The Forgotten Man (Graphic Edition)'

    By David Wilezol

    "We are all Keynesians now," Milton Friedman famously wrote in 1965. At that time, Friedman was reflecting on several decades of government interventionism in economic policy. Published June 23, 2014

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'I Am Malala'

    By Michael Taube - Special to The Washington Times

    Malala Yousafzai is only 16 years old. Yet she has already seen, experienced and done more than most of us ever will in a lifetime. Published June 20, 2014

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'My Salinger Year'

    By Claire Hopley - Special to The Washington Times

    "My Salinger Year" is a slightly fictionalized memoir of a year author Joanna Rakoff spent working for a top New York literary agency. It's 1996. She's just dropped out of graduate school because she wants to produce literature, not analyze it. Published June 19, 2014

  • BOOK REVIEW: 'Queen Victoria'

    By Muriel Dobbin - Special to The Washington Times

    Before she even reached the throne, Queen Victoria was denouncing her predecessor, Queen Elizabeth I, whom she described as "a great Queen but a bad woman." Published June 19, 2014

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