Republican John 'Mick' Michael Mulvaney

House
John 'Mick' Michael Mulvaney

Birthdate: July 21, 1967
Birth Place: Alexandria, VA, United States
Residence: Indian Land, SC
Religion: Catholic
First Elected: 2010
Gender: Male

Candidacy

Party: Republican
State: South Carolina
Office: House
District: District 5

Education

Graduate: University of North Carolina

Degree: JD

Graduate: Harvard University

Degree: OPM

Undergraduate: Georgetown University

Degree: BS

Mick Mulvaney was born in Alexandria, Va., grew up in Charlotte, N.C., and now resides in Indian Land, S.C. He earned a bachelor's degree in foreign service from Georgetown University in 1989 and a law degree from the University of North Carolina in 1992. He completed the owner/president management program at Harvard University's Business School in 2006.

Mulvaney worked in a Charlotte law firm from 1992 to 1997. He started his own firm, then sold it in 2000 and joined his family's homebuilding and real estate business. He became an owner of Salsarita's Fresh Cantina in early 2009 and was first elected to Congress in 2010.

Mulvaney is a member of St. Philip Neri Catholic Church in Fort Mill and Our Lady of Grace Catholic Mission in Indian Land.

He and his wife, Pam, have triplets.

Profile

Mick Mulvaney rode an anti-incumbency mood among national voters, as well as a backlash against President Barack Obama's policies to win election to Congress in 2010. He ousted incumbent Democratic Rep. John Spratt, 55 percent to 45 percent, becoming the first Republican to represent South Carolina's 5th District since 1883.

In the November 2012 election, Mulvaney faces Joyce Knott, a former Spratt staffer, who was unopposed in the Democratic primary.

Mulvaney has positioned himself as a tea party conservative, supporting limited government, transparency and _ though he previously opposed them _ term limits. He was among a group of state senators with a "Don't Tread on Me" flag on their desks.

Mulvaney supports a repeal of the 2010 health care reform bill and expressed disappointment in the June 2012 Supreme Court decision upholding the legislation. He said the precedent set in the case will exceed health care.

He supports a repeal of the No Child Left Behind education law, calling it an unfunded mandate on teachers and schools and evidence of a larger problem of too much control from Washington. He believes education-based decisions are best left to teachers and parents, not the federal government.

Mulvaney initially decided to run for Congress in November 2009 _ two months after voters in Spratt's increasingly conservative home county of York booed and jeered the Democrat at a meeting on health care. Mulvaney's announcement came just one year after he captured his state Senate seat, which he won after a single term in the state House.

Mulvaney said he recognized that some voters would criticize his short time in politics but hoped more would see it as a positive that he's not "part of the system." Mulvaney backed Rick Perry in the 2012 GOP presidential primary race, advising the Texas governor on economic issues. He said he supported Perry's record to cut spending and balance budgets.

While campaigning in 2010, Mulvaney hammered Spratt on his support of the 2009 approximately $800 billion economic stimulus package, cap-and-trade legislation and the 2010 health care reform bill. He and national Republicans faulted Spratt _ who had consistently touted his role in writing the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 _ for the U.S. House's failure to pass a comprehensive budget for the 2010-11 fiscal year that would have forced Democrats to go on record in support of huge deficits.

The 5th District stretches more than 130 miles across 14 counties in northern South Carolina. York County, just south of Charlotte, N.C., has grown exponentially _ accounting for 30 percent of the district's registered voters _ and leans heavily Republican. But the district also includes some of the state's most rural counties and its highest unemployment.

York and northern Lancaster counties have increasingly became bedroom communities for Charlotte, changing the voting landscape. Mulvaney, a Charlotte native, moved to Indian Land, just south of the state line, in December 2002.

Source: Associated Press

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