Republican Leonard Lance

House
Leonard Lance

Birthdate: June 25, 1952
Birth Place: Easton, PA, United States
Residence: Clinton, NJ
Religion: Catholic
First Elected: 2008
Gender: Male

Candidacy

Party: Republican
State: New Jersey
Office: House
District: District 7

Education

Undergraduate: Lehigh University

Degree: BA

Graduate: Princeton University

Degree: MPA

Graduate: Vanderbilt University

Degree: JD

Leonard Lance was born in Easton, Penn., and he resides in Clinton, N.J. He earned a bachelor's degree from Lehigh University, a master's degree from Princeton University and a law degree from Vanderbilt University.

Lance's family has been in Hunterdon County since Colonial times. His great uncle, H. Kiefer Lance, and his father, Wesley L. Lance, were both legislators.

Lance was a law clerk to two Warren County court judges in the 1970s and assistant counsel for Gov. Thomas H. Kean in the 1980s.

He was elected to the state Assembly in 1991, serving until his election to the state Senate in 2002. He was the minority leader in the state Senate from 2004 to 2007.

He was elected to the U.S. House in 2008.

Lance and his wife, Heidi, have one child.

Profile

Leonard Lance is a self-described moderate Republican representing New Jersey's 7th Congressional District.

As when he was in New Jersey's Legislature, one of Lance's prime focuses in the House has been pushing for lower taxes. "Our current tax system is too complex, too costly and too burdensome," Lance said in 2012.

He has said he favors extending the George W. Bush-era tax cuts. He also has been a co-sponsor of legislation to eliminate the Alternative Minimum Tax, which he calls onerous.

Lance has called the 2010 health care reform bill "fiscally irresponsible" and pushed for its repeal and replacement with "a more common sense alternative."

On his website, he boasts of a "100 percent voting record with National Right to Life Committee for his pro-life votes in the 112th Congress."

Lance grew up in Hunterdon County; his family has been influential in state politics for generations.

He won an open seat in the heavily Republican 7th Congressional District in 2008 and was re-elected two years later. The district represents portions of Hunterdon, Somerset, Union and Middlesex counties.

Lance demonstrated his independence to voters when he broke with Bush and his party's 2008 presidential candidate, Sen. John McCain, on a proposal to allow offshore oil drilling, citing its potential harm to New Jersey.

He introduced legislation in March 2009 that sought to direct the Treasury Department to recoup the retention bonuses that American International Group had paid some of its employees.

He supported a bill that renewed the State Children's Health Insurance Program, which extended government-sponsored coverage to about 4 million uninsured children.

Lance voted against the Troubled Assets Relief Program and against repealing the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy, which prohibits gays from serving openly in the military.

He sponsored the so-called Pay It Back Act of 2009, which would require all unspent federal stimulus and financial industry bailout money to be returned to the federal government.

Lance spent 17 years in the New Jersey Legislature before his election to Congress. He served in the state Assembly from 1991 to 2002, where he chaired the Budget Committee. He was then elected to the state Senate, where he served as minority leader from 2004 to 2008.

He distinguished himself in the state Senate as a fiscal watchdog hounding the Democratic majority, going as far as to take former Gov. James E. McGreevey to court to stop the state from borrowing money to balance the budget. The state Supreme Court eventually decided in Lance's favor.

State voters approved in 2008 a Lance-backed state constitutional amendment mandating that all future borrowing be approved by voters.

He also authored a successful effort to require funding for open space preservation and was the prime sponsor of a measure that established funds for the New Jersey Cultural Trust.

Source: Associated Press

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