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Tea Time with Judson Phillips

Judson Phillips

Judson Phillips

Judson Phillips is the founder of Tea Party Nation, one of the largest Tea Party Groups in the country and the number one national tea party site on the Internet.A lawyer by profession, Judson has been involved in politics since his teens. “Ronald Reagan inspired me,” he says.Judson became involved in the Tea Party movement in February 2009 after hearing Rick Santelli’s rant on CNBC.   “I heard there was going to be a Tea Party in Chicago inspired by Santelli, but didn’t know if anyone was doing a rally in Nashville where I was based.  Finally I emailed Michelle Malkin and asked her if there was a Tea Party in Nashville.  Malkin sent an email back saying, ‘No, why don’t you organize one?’  I did.”The first Tea Party in Nashville was held late February 2009 which drew a crowd of about 600. Judson then organized the Tax Day Tea Party in Nashville, which drew over 10,000 people into downtown.   It was at this time that Tea Party Nation was formed.  Later that year, Judson decided to bring activists from across the country together, so he organized the first National Tea Party Convention in February 2010, which featured Alaska’s former Governor and Republican Vice Presidential Nominee, Sarah Palin as it’s keynote speaker.He currently manages the Tea Party Nation website, writes several daily columns and is working on more projects than any one person should.  He is a frequent guest on cable and broadcast news shows, including on Fox, MSNBC, CNN and others.

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FILE - In this Saturday, Dec. 12, 2015 file photo, US President Barack Obama speaks about the Paris climate agreement from the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. About 160 countries are expected to sign the Paris Agreement on climate change Friday, April 22, 2016, in a symbolic triumph for a landmark deal that once seemed unlikely but now appears on track to enter into force years ahead of schedule. The U.S. and China, which together account for nearly 40 percent of global emissions, have said they intend to formally join the agreement this year.  (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., flanked by, Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., left, and Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, May 2, 2017, following a policy luncheon. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

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Illustration: Reagan tax reform by Greg Groesch for The Washington Times.

Will tax reform fail, too?

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., talks to reporters before the vote to confirm President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, April 7, 2017. The Republican majority changed Senate rules to lower the vote threshold for Supreme Court nominees from 60 votes to a simple majority to counter Democratic resistance. McConnell also supported Trump's airstrike on Syria. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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Students at the University of Texas at Austin lead a protest down to Congress Bridge Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, in Austin, Texas. Hundreds of University of Texas students march through downtown Austin in protest of Donald Trump's presidential victory. (Joshua Guerra/The Daily Texan via AP)

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Longtime Clinton ally James Carville said Monday that FBI Director James Comey's bombshell letter to lawmakers last week was a concerted effort by the FBI and House Republicans to "hijack an election." (MSNBC)

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Indiana Gov. Mike Pence "is the most conservative vice presidential nominee" in 50 years, according to the American Conservative Union. (Associated Press)

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a rally at the Downtown Toledo Train Station in Toledo, Ohio, Monday, Oct. 3, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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President-elect Barack Obama, left, stands with Secretary of State-designate Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., right, at a news conference in Chicago, Dec. 1, 2008. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais) **FILE**

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Gary Johnson won the party's presidential nomination on the second ballot with 55.8 percent of the delegate vote, giving him a second shot at the presidency after winning about 1.72 million votes as the party's candidate in 2012. (Associated Press)

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Akron, Ohio, Monday, Aug. 22, 2016. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) **FILE**

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Tea party-candidate Joe Carr, Tennessee Republican, is running against Sen. Lamar Alexander. (Photo: Joe Carr campaign for Senate)

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FBI Director James Comey makes a statement at FBI Headquarters in Washington, Tuesday, July 5, 2016. Comey said the FBI will not recommend criminal charges in its investigation into Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server while secretary of state. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

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In this frame grab taken from AP video Georgia Rep. John Lewis, center, leads a sit-in of more than 200 Democrats in demanding a vote on measures to expand background checks and block gun purchases by some suspected terrorists in the aftermath of last week's massacre in Orlando, Florida, that killed 49 people in a gay nightclub.  Rebellious Democrats shut down the House's legislative work on Wednesday, June 22, 2016, staging a sit-in on the House floor and refusing to leave until they secured a vote on gun control measures before lawmakers' weeklong break.  (AP Photo)

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a news conference at the Trump National Golf Club Westchester, Tuesday, June 7, 2016, in Briarcliff Manor, N.Y. (Photo/Mary Altaffer)

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The U.S. government alleged that ASSA Corp. was created by Iran's Bank Melli to hold its interest in a building located at 650 Fifth Ave. in New York. The building's construction had been partly financed by a Bank Melli loan, U.S. Treasury said. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig/File)

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