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Ebola health workers spray disinfectant on a road near the home of a 17-year-old boy that died from the Ebola virus on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, Wednesday, July 1, 2015. (AP Photo/ Abbas Dulleh)

Experimental Ebola vaccine could stop virus in West Africa

Associated Press

An experimental vaccine tested on thousands of people in Guinea exposed to Ebola seems to work and might help shut down the ongoing epidemic in West Africa, according to interim results from a study published Friday.

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Charlie is an autism service dog in training

- Associated Press

Animal lover and trainer Julie Shaw wants you to meet Charlie, a 10-week-old Australian Labradoodle bred for calmness - not because he's so cute and cuddly, which is a bonus, but because it will help raise awareness about autism.

5 things to know about the fight over Planned Parenthood

- Associated Press

Republicans will likely lose Monday's Senate showdown over halting federal aid to Planned Parenthood. Yet the political offensive by abortion foes has just started, prompted by a batch of unsettling videos that has focused attention on the group's little-noticed practice of providing fetal tissue to researchers.

An image of International Association of Athletics Federations President Lamine Diack speaking is shown above International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach, center, and others on the stage during the 128th IOC session in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Monday, Aug. 3, 2015. Three weeks before the world championships, athletics was thrown into turmoil by new accusations of widespread doping and experts denouncing an anti-doping system compromised by leniency. German broadcaster ARD and The Sunday Times newspaper in Britain said they obtained access to the results of 12,000 blood tests from 5,000 athletes. The files came from the database of the IAAF and were leaked by a whistleblower, according to the reports. The IAAF said it was aware of "serious allegations made against the integrity and competence of its anti-doping program." (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

IOC ready to act if Olympic medals affected by doping

- Associated Press

The IOC will take action against any Olympic athletes if they are found guilty of the latest doping allegations rocking the sport of track and field, IOC President Thomas Bach said Monday.

In this July 23, 2015 photo, Newton's football coach W.T. Johnston who is suffering from Graft-versus-host disease, stands on the field at the Eagle's stadium in Newton, Texas.  Despite his ailment, Johnston said he is determined to coach the team this season. (Guiseppe Barranco/The Beaumont Enterprise via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

Southeast Texas grid coach fights disease on his terms

- Associated Press

Holding his thumb and index finger three inches apart, W.T. Johnston allowed himself a wry smile, nearly invisible behind a medical mask, at the idea that his life could depend on a small vial of an experimental Egyptian medicine.

FILE - This Sept. 22, 2014 file photo shows Brussels sprouts in Concord, N.H. New research suggests the picky eating problem is rarely worth fretting over, although in a small portion of kids it may signal emotional troubles that should be checked out. The study was published Monday, Aug. 3, 2015, in the journal Pediatrics. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead, File)

Most picky eating harmless but it can signal emotional woes

- Associated Press

Parents of picky eaters take heart: New research suggests the problem is rarely worth fretting over, although in a small portion of kids it may signal emotional troubles that should be checked out.

5 things about Congress' fight over Planned Parenthood

- Associated Press

Republicans will likely lose Monday's Senate showdown over halting federal aid to Planned Parenthood. Yet the political offensive by abortion foes has just started, prompted by a batch of unsettling videos that has focused attention on the group's little-noticed practice of providing fetal tissue to researchers.

Board: Acupuncturist negligent in giving bee sting therapy

Associated Press

An acupuncturist in Southern California could have his medical license suspended by state regulators who claim he used bee stings to treat patients and didn't have an allergic reaction kit in his office.