Skip to content

Health

Featured Articles

** FILE ** (Associated Press)

Novel heart failure drug shows big promise: study

- Associated Press

A new study reports one of the biggest potential advances against heart failure in more than a decade - a first-of-a-kind, experimental drug that lowered the chances of death or hospitalization by about 20 percent.

Obamacare advocates target Hispanics in enrollment push

- The Washington Times

A map in Angela Franco’s office highlights the D.C. streets most likely to have Hispanic business owners, and it serves as a blueprint for foot soldiers who have been pounding the pavement to get people covered through the city’s Obamacare exchange.

In this photo taken on Wednesday, Aug. 27, 2014,  Red Cross workers walk through a section of West Point, an area that has been hit hard by the Ebola virus, with residents not allowed to leave as government forces clamp down on movement to prevent the spread of Ebola, in  Monrovia, Liberia. The Ebola outbreak in West Africa eventually could exceed 20,000 cases, more than six times as many as are now known, the World Health Organization said Thursday. A new plan released by the U.N. health agency to stop Ebola also assumes that the actual number of cases in many hard-hit areas may be two to four times higher than currently reported. (AP Photo/Abbas Dulleh)

Ebola arrives in Senegal as outbreak accelerates

- Associated Press

A man infected with Ebola traveled to Senegal, bringing to the country the first confirmed case of the dreaded disease that has hit four other West African nations and killed more than 1,500 people, the Ministry of Health said Friday.

Related Articles

Surrogate offers clues into man with 16 babies

- Associated Press

When the young Thai woman saw an online ad seeking surrogate mothers, it seemed like a life-altering deal: $10,000 to help a foreign couple that wanted a child but couldn't conceive.

FILE - This  Oct. 8, 2012 file photo shows the wrecked Subaru Impreza in which four people died as it is loaded onto a flatbed truck on the Southern State Parkway in West Hempstead, N.Y., after and early-morning accident. At the wheel was a New York teenager, Joseph Beer, who had smoked about $20 worth of marijuana, before getting into the car with four friends, and driving over 100 mph before crashing into trees with such force that it split the car in half. As states liberalize their marijuana laws, public officials and safety advocates worry that more drivers high on pot will lead to a spike in traffic deaths. Researchers who have studied the issue, though, are divided over whether toking before taking the wheel in fact leads to more accidents. (AP Photo/Frank Eltman, File)

Marijuana's hazy contribution to highway deaths

- Associated Press

New York teenager Joseph Beer smoked marijuana, climbed into a Subaru Impreza with four friends and drove more than 100 mph before losing control. The car crashed into trees with such force that the vehicle split in half, killing his friends.

Florida receives $300,000 in pharmacy settlement

Associated Press

Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi says the state is getting $300,000 as part of a national settlement with a Cincinnati-based company that allegedly engaged in a kickback scheme with skilled-nursing facilities.

5 things to know about driving on marijuana

- Associated Press

The legalization of recreational marijuana in two states - Colorado and Washington - and medical marijuana in more than 20 others has raised concern that there will be more drivers stoned behind the wheel. What's not clear is whether that will translate into an increase in fatal crashes. Five things to know about marijuana and driving:

Ivory Coast will allow Sierra Leone team in

- Associated Press

The Ivory Coast government decided late Monday to allow Sierra Leone's team to enter the country, giving the go-ahead for an African Cup qualifier after fears over Ebola put the game and Ivory Coast's place in the tournament in doubt.

This is an undated handout photos issued by England's Hampshire Police on Monday Sept. 1, 2014,  of Brett King and Naghemeh King, the parents of Ashya King, who have legal proceedings against them continuing in Spain after they took the five-year-old brain cancer patient out of hospital without doctors' consent.  Critically-ill 5-year-old boy Ashya King driven to Spain by his parents is receiving medical treatment for a brain tumor in a Spanish hospital as his parents await extradition to Britain, police said Sunday Aug. 31 2014. Officers received a phone call late Saturday from a hotel east of Malaga advising that a vehicle fitting the description circulated by police was on its premises. Both parents were arrested and the boy, Ashya King, was taken to a hospital, a Spanish police spokesman said. (AP Photo/Hampshire Police)

UK deputy leader criticizes ill boy case

Associated Press

U.K. Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg says it is inappropriate to throw the full weight of the law at a family who spirited their ill 5-year-old child out of the country in order for him to receive a revolutionary type of radiation therapy for a brain tumor.

In this Aug. 26, 2014 photo, Police Col. Decha Promsuwan, an investigator in a surrogacy scandal involving a Japanese businessman, shows documents during an interview at Lumpini police station in Bangkok,Thailand. Wassana, a young Thai woman, answered an online ad offering $10,000 for surrogate mothers and is now embroiled in the case of a mysterious Japanese man, Mitsutoki Shigeta, who police say fathered at least 16 children through surrogates. The case has captivated Thailand and is at the center of a growing scandal over commercial surrogacy, an industry that thrived on semi-secrecy and legal loopholes that the country's military government now vows to ban. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

9 steps a Japanese man took to 16 surrogate babies

- Associated Press

Police say Japanese businessman Mitsutoki Shigeta followed nine key steps on his path to fathering 16 surrogate babies in Thailand, born starting in June 2013. It's unclear whether he went through all of the steps for every baby; four are in Cambodia and the rest remain in Thailand. Here's how he did it:

9 African wrestlers barred from worlds

Associated Press

The governing body of wrestling says nine athletes cannot compete at the upcoming world championships because of travel restrictions imposed since the Ebola virus outbreak in west Africa.

5 things to know about the Florida election

- Associated Press

Florida's governor's race will be a nationally watched contest between unpopular Republican Gov. Rick Scott, who won office during the tea party surge and now advocates for more government spending, and former Gov. Charlie Crist, who used to call himself a Ronald Reagan Republican and now cozies up to President Barack Obama. And it will be brutal.

No talks set as CHI Health-Blue Cross pact expires

- Associated Press

A contract between Blue Cross Blue Shield of Nebraska and Catholic Health Initiatives' UniNet has expired, and officials for both said Monday that no negotiations have been scheduled.

FILE - This  Oct. 8, 2012 file photo shows the wrecked Subaru Impreza in which four people died as it is loaded onto a flatbed truck on the Southern State Parkway in West Hempstead, N.Y., after and early-morning accident. At the wheel was a New York teenager, Joseph Beer, who had smoked about $20 worth of marijuana, before getting into the car with four friends, and driving over 100 mph before crashing into trees with such force that it split the car in half. As states liberalize their marijuana laws, public officials and safety advocates worry that more drivers high on pot will lead to a spike in traffic deaths. Researchers who have studied the issue, though, are divided over whether toking before taking the wheel in fact leads to more accidents. (AP Photo/Frank Eltman, File)

Will traffic deaths rise as states legalize pot?

- Associated Press

As states liberalize their marijuana laws, public officials and safety advocates worry that more drivers high on pot will lead to a big increase in traffic deaths. Researchers who have studied the issue, though, are divided on the question.

Mason City man sent to mental health facility

Associated Press

A Mason City man found not guilty by reason of insanity in the stabbing death of his father is being sent to the state's Cherokee Mental Health Institute.

Medical center opens neuroscience institute

- Associated Press

Being No. 1 isn't always best, and Washington Regional Medical Center hopes to help knock Arkansas off the top of the stroke mortality list.

Senegal monitors contacts of 1st Ebola patient

- Associated Press

Senegalese authorities on Monday were monitoring everyone who was in contact with a student infected with Ebola who crossed into the country, and who has lost three family members to the disease.