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Rescue workers comb through the rubble of a children's hospital after a gas truck exploded, in Cuajimalpa on the outskirts of Mexico City, Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015. The powerful explosion shattered the hospital on the western edge of Mexico's capital, killing at least three adults and one baby and injuring dozens. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Gas blast wrecks Mexico children's hospital, killing 3

- Associated Press

Injured and bleeding, mothers grasping infants in their arms fled from a maternity hospital shattered by a powerful gas explosion Thursday, and rescuers began smashing sledgehammers through fallen concrete hunting for others who might be trapped.

Pediatrician Charles Goodman vaccinates 1 year- old Cameron Fierro with the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, or MMR vaccine at his practice in Northridge, Calif., Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015.   Some doctors are adamant about not accepting patients who don't believe in vaccinations, with some saying they don't want to be responsible for someone's death from an illness that was preventable. Others warn that refusing treatment to such people will just send them into the arms of quacks. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Some doctors won't see patients with anti-vaccine views

- Associated Press

With California gripped by a measles outbreak, Dr. Charles Goodman posted a clear notice in his waiting room and on Facebook: His practice will no longer see children whose parents won't get them vaccinated.

OSU names new director at animal disease diagnostic lab

Associated Press

The Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences has announced the appointment of a new director and assistant director for its Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory.

Rep.Jay Rodne, R-Snoqualmie, speaks in support of a bill seeking judicial review in mental illness cases, Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015, in Olympia, Wash. The state House unanimously passed a bill called "Joel's Law" to allow family members to ask a judge to review cases whenever a mental health professional decides against detaining someone who could be a danger to themselves or others. (AP Photo/Rachel La Corte)

House passes judicial review of mental health decisions

- Associated Press

The Washington state House on Thursday unanimously passed a bill allowing family members to ask a judge to step in if a mental health professional will not involuntarily commit a relative they believe could be suicidal or a danger to others.

FILE-This Jan. 13, 2015 file photo, shows parents of children who suffer from epilepsy. With virtually no hard proof that medical marijuana benefits sick children, and evidence that it may harm developing brains, the drug should only be used for severely ill kids who have no other treatment option, the nation's most influential pediatricians group says in a new policy. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Medical pot only OK for sick kids failed by other drugs: MDs

- Associated Press

With virtually no hard proof that medical marijuana benefits sick children, and evidence that it may harm developing brains, the drug should only be used for severely ill kids who have no other treatment option, the nation's most influential pediatricians group says in a new policy.

In this Jan. 22, 2015, photo, Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., 75, talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, for the first time since he suffered an eye injury and broken ribs on New Year's Day, when a piece of exercise equipment he was using broke and sent him smashing into cabinets at his new home. Reid has undergone surgery on Monday, Jan. 26 to remove a blood clot in his right eye and repair bones in his face, injuries from in an accident he suffered while exercising more than three weeks ago. A spokesman said the surgery was successful and that doctors are optimistic that the 75-year-old Reid will regain vision in his injured eye but are not yet able to say if that will be the case.(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Sen. Harry Reid undergoes surgery on eye

Associated Press

Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid underwent surgery Monday to remove a blood clot in his right eye and repair bones in his face, injuries from an accident he suffered while exercising more than three weeks ago.