Bethesda 'Passive house' uses less energy

Although the windows appear recessed, that is actually a function of all the exterior walls of the Passive House being built 8 inches thick to accomodate for extra insulation and sealing. The windows also crank out as opposed to opening up from the bottom, which means they won't have as many sides that they can leak air. This home in Bethesda, Md., which is a joint venture of O'Neill Development Corporation and Peabody Architects, is the first of its kind in the Washington, D.C., area. This image was made Monday, April 18, 2011. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

Although the windows appear recessed, that is actually a function of all the exterior walls of the Passive House being built 8 inches thick to accomodate for extra insulation and sealing. The windows also crank out as opposed to opening up from the bottom, which means they won't have as many sides that they can leak air. This home in Bethesda, Md., which is a joint venture of O'Neill Development Corporation and Peabody Architects, is the first of its kind in the Washington, D.C., area. This image was made Monday, April 18, 2011. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

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