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In this Aug. 13, 2010 photo provided by the North Dakota Petroleum Council is an oil rig in North Dakota's oil patch. Across the state's active oil fields drilling crews, road builders and those who want to plunge their equipment into the ground often must wait for another team known for slow, meticulous study _ archaeologists, whose job is to survey the land before a single spade of dirt can be turned. The routine surveys have produced a rare jobs bonanza in American archaeology and with more archaeologists now working in the oil fields, the number of historic sites in North Dakota jumped from 846 in 2009 to nearly 2,260 in 2013. (AP Photo/North Dakota Petroleum Council)

In this Aug. 13, 2010 photo provided by the North Dakota Petroleum Council is an oil rig in North Dakota's oil patch. Across the state's active oil fields drilling crews, road builders and those who want to plunge their equipment into the ground often must wait for another team known for slow, meticulous study _ archaeologists, whose job is to survey the land before a single spade of dirt can be turned. The routine surveys have produced a rare jobs bonanza in American archaeology and with more archaeologists now working in the oil fields, the number of historic sites in North Dakota jumped from 846 in 2009 to nearly 2,260 in 2013. (AP Photo/North Dakota Petroleum Council)

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