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A jeweler's employee holding a Faberge Egg, one of the eight missing Faberge imperial eggs that was found at a flea market in the American Midwest, poses for photographers in central London, Monday, April 7, 2014. It was originally given by Tsar Alexander III to his wife Empress Maria Feodorovna for Easter 1887. A London antique dealer said that a scrap metal entrepreneur bought the egg for about 14,000 US dollars, thinking he could make a small profit by reselling the piece for its gold content. It turned out the jewel-encrusted piece was worth millions. Both buyer and seller want to remain anonymous, and did not disclose the sale price — but experts note that a non-imperial Faberge egg sold at Christie's for 18.5 million US dollars in 2007. Only 50 of the imperial eggs were made for the royal family, and eight remained missing before the latest find, though only three of those are known to have survived the Russian revolution. It will be on display at Wartski's London showroom April 14-17, the first time it will have been seen in public for 112 years. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
Photo by: Lefteris Pitarakis
A jeweler's employee holding a Faberge Egg, one of the eight missing Faberge imperial eggs that was found at a flea market in the American Midwest, poses for photographers in central London, Monday, April 7, 2014. It was originally given by Tsar Alexander III to his wife Empress Maria Feodorovna for Easter 1887. A London antique dealer said that a scrap metal entrepreneur bought the egg for about 14,000 US dollars, thinking he could make a small profit by reselling the piece for its gold content. It turned out the jewel-encrusted piece was worth millions. Both buyer and seller want to remain anonymous, and did not disclose the sale price — but experts note that a non-imperial Faberge egg sold at Christie's for 18.5 million US dollars in 2007. Only 50 of the imperial eggs were made for the royal family, and eight remained missing before the latest find, though only three of those are known to have survived the Russian revolution. It will be on display at Wartski's London showroom April 14-17, the first time it will have been seen in public for 112 years. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

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