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Bacteria use for producing anti-body against malaria are seen through a microscope at Westminster University in London, Tuesday, March 15, 2011. In a cramped London laboratory filled with test tubes, bacteria and mosquitoes, scientists are trying to engineer a new weapon in the battle against malaria: a mutant fungus.  For years, Angray Kang at Westminster University and colleagues have been testing whether they could genetically tweak a fungus to kill the malaria parasite carried by mosquitoes. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)
Photo by: Sang Tan
Bacteria use for producing anti-body against malaria are seen through a microscope at Westminster University in London, Tuesday, March 15, 2011. In a cramped London laboratory filled with test tubes, bacteria and mosquitoes, scientists are trying to engineer a new weapon in the battle against malaria: a mutant fungus. For years, Angray Kang at Westminster University and colleagues have been testing whether they could genetically tweak a fungus to kill the malaria parasite carried by mosquitoes. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)

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