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View of two flutes of Champagne, the one at left having being filled straight down into the flute, and the one at right having being filled the "beer-like way," Thursday Aug. 12, 2010 in Paris, to  illustrate a theory by French scientist from Reims university. French scientists at the University of Reims in the home of Champagne have determined that pouring bubbly on a slant like you would a beer is actually a better way to serve Champagne because it preserves more of the tiny gas bubbles that improve the drink's flavor and aromas.(Ap Photo/Jacques Brinon)
Photo by: Jacques Brinon
View of two flutes of Champagne, the one at left having being filled straight down into the flute, and the one at right having being filled the "beer-like way," Thursday Aug. 12, 2010 in Paris, to illustrate a theory by French scientist from Reims university. French scientists at the University of Reims in the home of Champagne have determined that pouring bubbly on a slant like you would a beer is actually a better way to serve Champagne because it preserves more of the tiny gas bubbles that improve the drink's flavor and aromas.(Ap Photo/Jacques Brinon)

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