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Thirteen-year-old Tine Valencic from Colleyville, Texas, wipes tears from his eyes after winning the 2011 National Geographic Bee in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday, May 25, 2011. His mother, Jana, center, stands by him while National Geographic Society president Tim Kelly, right applauds. Tine beat the other 10 finalists and was the only contestant who did not get one question wrong in the entire bee. He received a $25,000 scholarship, a lifetime membership in the National Geographic Society and an all-expense-paid trip for two to the Galapagos Islands. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
Photo by: BARBARA L. SALISBURY
Thirteen-year-old Tine Valencic from Colleyville, Texas, wipes tears from his eyes after winning the 2011 National Geographic Bee in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday, May 25, 2011. His mother, Jana, center, stands by him while National Geographic Society president Tim Kelly, right applauds. Tine beat the other 10 finalists and was the only contestant who did not get one question wrong in the entire bee. He received a $25,000 scholarship, a lifetime membership in the National Geographic Society and an all-expense-paid trip for two to the Galapagos Islands. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

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