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** FILE ** In this Tuesday, Jan. 29. 2013, photo, retired Infantryman Brendan M. Marrocco participates in a news conference at Johns Hopkins hospital in Baltimore. Marrocco received a transplant of two arms from a deceased donor after losing all four limbs in a 2009 roadside bomb attack in Iraq. A Boston hospital is starting the world's first pediatric hand transplant program, a profound sign of the increased acceptance of doing face, hand and other transplants to improve quality of life rather than to save a life as donated hearts, livers and other organs have in the past. (AP Photo/Gail Burton, File)
Photo by: Gail Burton
** FILE ** In this Tuesday, Jan. 29. 2013, photo, retired Infantryman Brendan M. Marrocco participates in a news conference at Johns Hopkins hospital in Baltimore. Marrocco received a transplant of two arms from a deceased donor after losing all four limbs in a 2009 roadside bomb attack in Iraq. A Boston hospital is starting the world's first pediatric hand transplant program, a profound sign of the increased acceptance of doing face, hand and other transplants to improve quality of life rather than to save a life as donated hearts, livers and other organs have in the past. (AP Photo/Gail Burton, File)

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