Immigrant Children.JPEG-0b4f9.jpg - Washington Times
Skip to content

FILE - This June 18, 2014, file photo shows a U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer as he helps a few boys to make phone calls, some of the hundreds of mostly Central American immigrant children that are being processed and held at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center in Nogales, Ariz. Thousands of immigrant children crossing alone into the U.S. can live in American cities, attend public schools and possibly work here for years without consequences. The chief reasons are an overburdened, deeply flawed system of immigration courts and a 2002 law intended to protect children's welfare, an Associated Press investigation finds. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, Pool, File)
Photo by: Ross D. Franklin
FILE - This June 18, 2014, file photo shows a U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer as he helps a few boys to make phone calls, some of the hundreds of mostly Central American immigrant children that are being processed and held at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center in Nogales, Ariz. Thousands of immigrant children crossing alone into the U.S. can live in American cities, attend public schools and possibly work here for years without consequences. The chief reasons are an overburdened, deeply flawed system of immigration courts and a 2002 law intended to protect children's welfare, an Associated Press investigation finds. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, Pool, File)

Featured Photo Galleries

Mahan 3.jpg

Say hello, Assad: See the Navy warships off the coast of Syria

The Navy has sent four warships — USS Ramage, USS Mahan, USS Gravely and USS Barry — armed with ballistic missiles into the eastern Mediterranean Sea amid violence in Syria. Navy ships are capable of a variety of military actions, including launching Tomahawk cruise missiles as they did against Libya in 2011.