KOREA_WEB_20121210_0007 - Washington Times
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**FILE** The Korean Peninsula is seen Sept. 24, 2012, at night from a composite assembled from data acquired by the Suomi NPP satellite. The image was made possible by the new satellite's "day-night band" of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), which detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses filtering techniques to observe dim signals such as city lights, gas flares, auroras, wildfires, and reflected moonlight. City lights at night are a fairly reliable indicator of where people live. But this isn't always the case, and the Korean Peninsula shows why. (Associated Press/NASA)
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**FILE** The Korean Peninsula is seen Sept. 24, 2012, at night from a composite assembled from data acquired by the Suomi NPP satellite. The image was made possible by the new satellite's "day-night band" of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), which detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses filtering techniques to observe dim signals such as city lights, gas flares, auroras, wildfires, and reflected moonlight. City lights at night are a fairly reliable indicator of where people live. But this isn't always the case, and the Korean Peninsula shows why. (Associated Press/NASA)

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