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American economist Dale Mortensen, 71, centre, is welcomed to a press conference at the University of Aarhus, in Aarhus, Denmark, Monday Oct. 11, 2010. Prof. Mortensen, along with Christopher Pissarides and Peter Diamond, has been awarded the 2010 Nobel economics prize for developing a theory that helps explain why a lot of people can remain unemployed despite a large number of job vacancies. The three men were honored for their analysis of the friction involved when buyers and sellers are paired up in markets. Mortensen is from Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., and is currently a visiting professor at the University of Aarhus. (AP Photo/Polfoto/ Andreas Szlavik)
Photo by: Andreas Szlavik
American economist Dale Mortensen, 71, centre, is welcomed to a press conference at the University of Aarhus, in Aarhus, Denmark, Monday Oct. 11, 2010. Prof. Mortensen, along with Christopher Pissarides and Peter Diamond, has been awarded the 2010 Nobel economics prize for developing a theory that helps explain why a lot of people can remain unemployed despite a large number of job vacancies. The three men were honored for their analysis of the friction involved when buyers and sellers are paired up in markets. Mortensen is from Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., and is currently a visiting professor at the University of Aarhus. (AP Photo/Polfoto/ Andreas Szlavik)

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