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 In a Tuesday, October 26, 2004, photo, convicted sniper Lee Boyd Malvo enters a courtroom in the Spotsylvania Circuit Court in Spotsylvania, Va. Malvo, convicted in the deadly sniper attacks that terrorized the Washington, D.C., area in 2002, says two others planned to participate in the attacks but backed out. The revelation comes in a prison interview for the Thursday premier of "Confessions of the DC Sniper with William Shatner: An Aftermath Special" on the A&E television network. (AP Photo/Mike Morones, File)
Photo by: MIKE MORONES
In a Tuesday, October 26, 2004, photo, convicted sniper Lee Boyd Malvo enters a courtroom in the Spotsylvania Circuit Court in Spotsylvania, Va. Malvo, convicted in the deadly sniper attacks that terrorized the Washington, D.C., area in 2002, says two others planned to participate in the attacks but backed out. The revelation comes in a prison interview for the Thursday premier of "Confessions of the DC Sniper with William Shatner: An Aftermath Special" on the A&E television network. (AP Photo/Mike Morones, File)

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