- The Washington Times - Tuesday, December 7, 1999

Readiness then…

 A series of official inquiries between 1941 to 1946 blamed Adm. H.E. Kimmel, commander-in-chief of the U.S. fleet, and Gen. Walter Short, commander of the Army Hawaiian Department, for a lack of readiness during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Though neither officer was ever officially charged with wrongdoing, both were relieved of their commands and ultimately retired at the lower ranks of rear admiral and major general.

According to the Naval Historical Foundation in Washington, they were apparently the only officers who served in World War II who were not retired at the highest rank they held.

Today, on this 58th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack, the actions of both officers will be the focus of a colloquium, beginning at 9 a.m. at the U.S. Navy Memorial’s Naval Heritage Center auditorium. These questions will be posed:

c Were national and military leaders too quick to render judgment?

c Were Adm. Kimmel and Gen. Short responsible to some degree for the disaster, or were they made scapegoats in the rush to hold someone accountable?

c Were there failures at higher levels of the chain of command in Washington?

Not that these questions weren’t raised before. Congress several times has considered exonerating Adm. Kimmel and posthumously advancing him to his former rank. And there have been no less than nine reviews of Adm. Kimmel’s and Gen. Short’s demotions, including one at the Pentagon in 1995 that found responsibility for Pearl Harbor “should be broadly shared.”

However, the Pentagon concluded that Adm. Kimmel and Gen. Short were commanders of Pearl Harbor and “as commanders, they were accountable.”

Adm. James L. Holloway III, chairman of the Navy Historical Foundation, says today’s objective will be to examine both Navy command accountability and the American sense of justice and fair play as they relate to the commanders.

…and readiness now

;When the United States pulls out of Panama next week under the Carter-Torrijos treaties of 1977, the Chinese will move in.

And while President Clinton and Vice President Al Gore won’t be on hand to greet them, Howard Phillips and Larry Klayman will.

“We’re heading down … to fill the void in the absence of President Bill Clinton,” Mr. Phillips, presidential candidate of the newly named Constitution Party (formerly the U.S. Taxpayers Party), tells Inside the Beltway.

Joining him for a news conference in Panama City Dec. 14 the official day of the Panama Canal hand-over will be Mr. Klayman, chief counsel for Judicial Watch and a persistent thorn in Mr. Clinton’s side.

For the next half-century, Panama has granted Hong Kong-based Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. the rights to control the 50-mile-long canal’s Pacific port facilities in Balboa and its Atlantic port facilities in Cristobal.

Mr. Phillips knows from recent history that much can occur in the world during such a lengthy span. He wants the U.S. military presence restored in Panama, a proposal the Clinton administration declined to consider in 1995.

“The canal is more important to us now than ever before,” says Mr. Phillips. “Our ability to rapidly transfer ships between the Atlantic and Pacific is essential.”

At a bare minimum, he says, U.S. intelligence must be vigilant in the region.

“There’s no way to monitor or control what comes in those [ship] containers,” he says. “I’ve been told that if one lock is blown up it will take two to three years to get the canal functioning again.”

Can’t win

“Whose Line Is It Anyway?” the television show hosted by Drew Carey, requires comedians to act out skits and create punch lines extemporaneously, based on themes and situations proposed by the audience.

One theme last week was “Political Slogans Doomed to Fail.”

Given the recent escapades of our commander in chief, most of the comedians went for sexual content. But a black comedian went for substance, and in doing so brought the house down.

When his turn came to offer a spontaneous political slogan doomed to fail, he simply walked up to the podium and said, “Hi, I’m Jesse Jackson.”

Can’t win

“Whose Line Is It Anyway?” the television show hosted by Drew Carey, requires comedians to act out skits and create punch lines extemporaneously, based on themes and situations proposed by the audience.

One theme last week was “Political Slogans Doomed to Fail.”

Given the recent escapades of our commander in chief, most of the comedians went for sexual content. But a black comedian went for substance, and in doing so brought the house down.

When his turn came to offer a spontaneous political slogan doomed to fail, he simply walked up to the podium and said, “Hi, I’m Jesse Jackson.”

Can’t win

“Whose Line Is It Anyway?” the television show hosted by Drew Carey, requires comedians to act out skits and create punch lines extemporaneously, based on themes and situations proposed by the audience.

One theme last week was “Political Slogans Doomed to Fail.”

Given the recent escapades of our commander in chief, most of the comedians went for sexual content. But a black comedian went for substance, and in doing so brought the house down.

When his turn came to offer a spontaneous political slogan doomed to fail, he simply walked up to the podium and said, “Hi, I’m Jesse Jackson.”

Can’t win

“Whose Line Is It Anyway?” the television show hosted by Drew Carey, requires comedians to act out skits and create punch lines extemporaneously, based on themes and situations proposed by the audience.

One theme last week was “Political Slogans Doomed to Fail.”

Given the recent escapades of our commander in chief, most of the comedians went for sexual content. But a black comedian went for substance, and in doing so brought the house down.

When his turn came to offer a spontaneous political slogan doomed to fail, he simply walked up to the podium and said, “Hi, I’m Jesse Jackson.”

Can’t win

“Whose Line Is It Anyway?” the television show hosted by Drew Carey, requires comedians to act out skits and create punch lines extemporaneously, based on themes and situations proposed by the audience.

One theme last week was “Political Slogans Doomed to Fail.”

Given the recent escapades of our commander in chief, most of the comedians went for sexual content. But a black comedian went for substance, and in doing so brought the house down.

When his turn came to offer a spontaneous political slogan doomed to fail, he simply walked up to the podium and said, “Hi, I’m Jesse Jackson.”

Can’t win

“Whose Line Is It Anyway?” the television show hosted by Drew Carey, requires comedians to act out skits and create punch lines extemporaneously, based on themes and situations proposed by the audience.

One theme last week was “Political Slogans Doomed to Fail.”

Given the recent escapades of our commander in chief, most of the comedians went for sexual content. But a black comedian went for substance, and in doing so brought the house down.

When his turn came to offer a spontaneous political slogan doomed to fail, he simply walked up to the podium and said, “Hi, I’m Jesse Jackson.”

Can’t win

“Whose Line Is It Anyway?” the television show hosted by Drew Carey, requires comedians to act out skits and create punch lines extemporaneously, based on themes and situations proposed by the audience.

One theme last week was “Political Slogans Doomed to Fail.”

Given the recent escapades of our commander in chief, most of the comedians went for sexual content. But a black comedian went for substance, and in doing so brought the house down.

When his turn came to offer a spontaneous political slogan doomed to fail, he simply walked up to the podium and said, “Hi, I’m Jesse Jackson.”

Can’t win

“Whose Line Is It Anyway?” the television show hosted by Drew Carey, requires comedians to act out skits and create punch lines extemporaneously, based on themes and situations proposed by the audience.

One theme last week was “Political Slogans Doomed to Fail.”

Given the recent escapades of our commander in chief, most of the comedians went for sexual content. But a black comedian went for substance, and in doing so brought the house down.

When his turn came to offer a spontaneous political slogan doomed to fail, he simply walked up to the podium and said, “Hi, I’m Jesse Jackson.”

LOAD COMMENTS ()

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide