- The Washington Times - Friday, April 28, 2000

Boy trouble

"It's a bad time to be a boy in America. The triumphant victory of the U.S. women's soccer team at the World Cup last summer has come to symbolize the spirit of American girls. The shooting at Columbine High last spring might be said to symbolize the spirit of American boys.
"That boys are in disrepute is not accidental. For many years women's groups have complained that boys benefit from a school system that favors them and is biased against girls. 'Schools shortchange girls,' declares the American Association of University Women… .
"That girls are treated as the second sex in school and consequently suffer, that boys are accorded privileges and consequently benefit these are things everyone is presumed to know. But they are not true… .
"Data from the U.S. Department of Education and from several recent university studies show that far from being shy and demoralized, today's girls outshine boys. They get better grades. They have higher educational aspirations… . At the same time, more boys than girls are suspended from school… . More boys than girls are involved in crime, alcohol, and drugs."
Christina Hoff Sommers, writing on "The War Against Boys," in the May issue of the Atlantic Monthly

'Virtually nonexistent'

"The scene was the parking lot of a mall in Biloxi, Miss., packed with young black people in town for an event called Black Spring Break. Suddenly, a shout went up from several male voices: 'There's a white girl! There's a white girl!' Seconds later, the girl was under attack. The mob pressed in, hands clawed at her, and her top was ripped off. As she tried to cover up and buried her face in her hands, the crowd shouted, laughed, and jeered at her. Hands shot up in the air some pumping fists triumphantly, others waving video cameras seeking to capture the girl's trauma for more laughs later on.
"The whole ugly scene was captured on film by a photographer for the Biloxi Sun-Herald… . Had the girl been black and the crowd white, those photos would surely have been splashed on front pages of newspapers across the country …. The assault would have become a symbol of racism … remembered and invoked for months probably years to come.
"Instead, the national media coverage was virtually nonexistent."
Matt Kaufman, writing on "Not Just Black and White," in the on-line magazine Boundless, at www.boundless.org

Castro's accomplices

"A whole cast of Americans have also covered themselves in shame by … abetting the purposes of Cuba's Stalin. There are first of all the active supporters of the communist police state, among them the reprehensible Rev. Joan Brown Campbell, who has made a career of spreading the dictator's lies and covering up for his crimes… .
"And there is the American media … who have miserably failed to report the facts, which would expose the Clinton-Castro charade, and instead have turned themselves into a transmission belt of the perpetrators' propaganda machines. For Newsweek's Eleanor Clift, Castro's prison is a 'lifestyle' that Juan Miguel and Elian are choosing: 'To be a poor child in Cuba may in many instances be better than being a poor child in Miami and I'm not going to condemn their lifestyle so gratuitously.'
"If Eleanor Clift had an ounce of decency when it came to her views of left-wing police states, she would name a single way in which it is better to be poor in Havana than in Miami, and put her morally bankrupt thesis to the test… .
"The invasion of a private home and the snatching of Elian Gonzalez at gunpoint are the signature acts of a police state, and one of the most disgraceful episodes in the history of the American presidency."
David Horowitz, writing on "Shame on Janet Reno," Tuesday in the on-line magazine Salon at www.salon.com

LOAD COMMENTS ()

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide