- The Washington Times - Wednesday, April 5, 2000

'Moneyed elite'

"In her most recent incarnation, [Arianna] Huffington is more convinced than ever that America is becoming two nations, 'a moneyed elite growing rich from globalization' and 'a growing underclass.' …

"At a dinner party in her Brentwood home, the idea was hatched that Warren Beatty could rouse the public by running for president… . Dozens of people e-mailed her, asking where they could send checks to Beatty. Yes, checks to a Hollywood zillionaire.

"In her book ['How to Overthrow the Government'], Huffington blasts the media for taking Donald Trump seriously. What's the difference between Trump and Beatty? I ask her. 'Oh, it's a big difference. Warren Beatty has an important message about America becoming one nation… . But there's no question that this notion of America being two nations with millions of Americans left out not just out of the prosperity, but out of the political conversation is I think a very important message.'

"Huffington is certainly correct in suggesting that something is deeply wrong with our political culture. It showers its attentions on people who are clever, glib, and adept at self-promotion, but have little in the way of principles or capacity for reflection."

Ramesh Ponnuru, writing on "Oh, Arianna" in the April 17 issue of National Review

Middle-class dreams

"What does it take for a low-income household to cross that $25,000 [annual income] threshold into the middle class? It helps to have two earners in the household, says [researcher Gregory] Acs.

"And that is a fundamental difference between middle-class hopefuls today and those of years past… . Between 1987 and 1997, households with two earners saw their income increase by 5 percent… .

"At the same time, households with one earner saw their income decrease by 2.3 percent. Today, having two earners is a requirement to keep up, says [economist Toni] Horst… .

" 'Education is the biggest ticket to the middle class,' says Horst. 'Not much happens without it.' "

Alison Stein Wellner, writing on "The Money in the Middle," in the April issue of American Demographics

Last gasp?

"Californians passed Proposition 187 by a 60-40 margin [in 1994]. The proposition would have expelled illegal aliens from public schools and cut off all benefits for illegal aliens except for emergency medical treatment… .

"Pro-illegal alien groups immediately set about to overturn the will of the voters. State legislator Art Torres addressed a group of Hispanic organizations assembled at the University of California Riverside and said, 'Power is not given to you. You have to take it. Remember Proposition 187 is the last gasp of white America.' …

Activist Joe Sanchez declared, 'We may not overcome, but we will overwhelm.' Ricky Sierra at a rally … said, 'We are here united and we're recolonizing America, so they're afraid of us they're very afraid. It's time to take back what is ours.' …

"At a demonstration in Westwood, Christopher Cebeda … declares, 'We are here … to show white Anglo-Saxon Protestant L.A. the few of you who remain that we're in the majority and we claim this land as ours. It's always been ours and we're still here and none of this talk about deporting. If anybody is going to be deported, it's going to be you.'

"And how do politicians in California react to all this? Republicans are struck dumb, paralyzed by fear of being branded racists and delusionally hopeful that they can win the Hispanic vote. Democrats, meanwhile, actively support illegal immigration, knowing that their constituent base is being expanded."

Roger McGrath, California State University history professor, speaking on "The Reconquista of California," Sunday at the American Renaissance conference in Reston, Va.

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