- The Washington Times - Thursday, August 17, 2000

Heart researchers still use few women

BOSTON In the 1980s, the federal government was criticized for doing most heart disease research on men, prompting a series of federal mandates designed to include more women as research subjects.
Now an evaluation of that effort has concluded that although more women are being studied, men continue to be the focus for much of the research on the leading cause of death for both sexes.
Today's New England Journal of Medicine reports that the number of women in clinical trials has jumped dramatically, but only because of two all-women studies.
"There have been no substantial increases in the proportion of women enrolled in mixed-sex trials over the past 30 years," wrote David Harris of Yale and Dr. Pamela Douglas of the University of Wisconsin.

Artists support pickets of New York museum

NEW YORK Strikers at the Museum of Modern Art got support this week from artists such as Robert Rauschenberg and Art Spiegelman, filmmakers Steven Spielberg and Martin Scorsese and performers Laurie Anderson and David Byrne.
The first strike in 27 years by museum employees including archivists, conservators, curators, librarians and other professionals has dragged on for more than three months.
Neither side seems willing to budge and each accuses the other of bad faith. Points of contention include salaries as well as union demands for compulsory membership of professional staff.
A total of 131 names were listed in a brief open letter in this week's Village Voice and Time Out New York asking the public to respect the picket line in front of the museum.

ACLU suing school over strip search

DETROIT The American Civil Liberties Union is suing a school district, saying a locker-room strip search of students for money missing from a student's wallet was unconstitutional.
The ACLU, which filed suit Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Ann Arbor, is representing six Whitmore Lake High School students, ages 15 to 18, said Michael J. Steinberg, the group's state legal director.
The lawsuit contends that the students' Fourth Amendment rights against unreasonable search and seizure were violated.
The search took place after a May 24 coed gym class, when a female student said $354 she had been collecting to rent a limousine for the school prom was missing from her wallet. The money was never found.

Cellular phone call saves crash victims

IRONWOOD, Mich. A plane crashed on a riverbank in a remote area, and a survivor summoned rescuers by calling 911 on his cell phone and telling an emergency dispatcher that he could hear flowing water nearby.
Two men were killed and two others injured in the crash late Monday of a private jet that was hit by lightning during a flight from Brainerd, Minn., to Flint.
The plane's pilot had notified officials that the lightning knocked out the plane's electronics and he was going to make an emergency landing at Gogebic Municipal Airport. But then controllers lost contact with him.
The break came Tuesday morning when survivor George Peck dialed 911 and was connected to the Iron County, Wis., Sheriff's Department.

LSU wins designation as top party school

BATON ROUGE, La. It's a list Louisiana State University officials were desperately trying to avoid, but instead, they're on top LSU has been named the No. 1 party college in America.
The designation by the Princeton Review was disheartening news to university officials still shaken by the August 1997 death of an LSU student who celebrated his acceptance into a fraternity with a night of binge drinking.
"I think the whole survey, from my point of view, would be very laughable if it didn't misinform people about the university's environment," Mark Emmert, chancellor of the school, said yesterday. "LSU is no more of a party school than any other American university."
Last year's No. 1, Florida State University, fell to fourth.

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