- The Washington Times - Wednesday, August 23, 2000

No apology, never

"There was no mention [at the Democratic National Convention] of the second impeachment trial in the country's history; no reference to anything [President] Clinton might have failed to do in his seven and a half years in office; no explicit exoneration of [Vice President Al] Gore in the Lewinsky ordeal that the president foisted on the country through his compulsive lying; no apology to the vice president, to the first lady, or to the country for what Clinton did to the rule of law or the simple credibility of the presidency through his multiple acts of perjury and deceit.

"In other words, Clinton behaved as Clinton always behaves: with no sense of duty, propriety, or honor, and above all with no sense of responsibility for his own actions. Even now. Even after everything. Even when the country is more than willing to let go of the past, if Clinton would only let go of his own self-serving distortion of it.

"The one thing Clinton needed to do last week was take final responsibility for his actions and set Gore free. He didn't. He never will."

Andrew Sullivan, writing on "One Last Time," in the Aug. 28 issue of the New Republic

American shortage

"Every year 900,000 legal immigrants are allowed into the United States. Many of them have critical technological skills which corporate America and government need because not enough Americans graduate in technical and scientific fields… .

"Shouldn't these jobs be held for Americans? That would be nice, but there are too few Americans who go into the sciences and math… .

"No, our educational system has been too busy teaching diversity and self-esteem and environmental myths as science rather than math and technical subjects. In addition, we are not reproducing ourselves in sufficient numbers to take care of the baby boomer bulge down the road.

"A baby dearth is going to be supporting the '60s generation and one wonders if they will put up with that situation before there is abortion on the other end of life.

"One reason Japan has suffered an economic crisis in recent years is because it has not reproduced itself. It aborted and contracepted itself into a crisis. The deeply homogenous Japanese are finding themselves faced with importing talent from elsewhere, including America."

Diane Alden, writing on "A run for the border," Aug. 14 in the on-line journal Enter Stage Right at www.enterstageright.com

Superman of golf

"Once in a generation, an athletic superman will stir the world's sporting multitudes with wonder on a scale to inspire cults and to overshadow kings, generals and stock-market prophets.

"But nobody has done it in the pressure tank of public scrutiny that put Tiger Woods this weekend to the ultimate test of the athlete who would be a champion of the ages.

"During the final round of the PGA Championship Sunday, he sealed his right to all those superlatives when the game became pure theater. When all of the opportunities to lose were there when the galleries and his opponent knew that he was not invincible the champion found a way to be a champion.

"Somebody in the endless postmortems expressed a fear, though. Tiger, he said, obviously can win in any venue and circumstance. Will Woods' dominance turn his competition into a caricature, demoralize the field, and therefore make golf the net loser in the long run? …

"[G]olf has never experienced the kind of visibility one that on Sunday carried the game right to the brink of public enchantment that it does today because of the aura of Tiger Woods.

"You can seriously argue that with the possible exception of President Clinton, Woods happens to be the most visible human being on earth, and both his ratings and his cash flow are a lot better."

Jim Klobuchar, writing on "Is Tiger too good for the game of golf?" in yesterday's Christian Science Monitor

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