- The Washington Times - Monday, August 28, 2000

Shipyard workers vote to strike

PORTLAND, Maine A union representing 4,800 workers at ship maker Bath Iron Works voted yesterday to strike, shutting down production at one of the biggest shipbuilders for the U.S. Navy.

The shipyard is one of Maine's largest private employers, with 7,600 employees, and is one of only two shipyards in the country that build the Navy's Aegis destroyers. The destroyers cost about $900 million when fully equipped.

Members of Local S6 of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers were upset over the company's pay proposal and proposed changes in work rules.

Police to interview JonBenet's parents

ATLANTA For the first time in more than two years, John and Patsy Ramsey are scheduled to meet today with investigators to discuss the unsolved slaying of their daughter, JonBenet.

The couple, who authorities say are still under suspicion in the 6-year-old's 1996 slaying, last met with police in June 1998. They rejected other proposed meetings over the terms of the interviews, including all attempts to interview them separately until now.

Family loses custody of overweight toddler

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. The parents of a 120-pound, 3-year-old girl say they have lost custody of the toddler because they couldn't control the girl's weight.

Miguel Regino and Adela Martinez say the New Mexico Children, Youth and Families Department took their daughter, Anamarie Martinez-Regino, after a doctor claimed the child's condition was life-threatening.

"They dragged her out of the room kicking and screaming," the child's grieving mother said after her daughter was taken from Presbyterian Hospital on Friday.

Executives to testify in tire death case

A Texas judge has ordered the CEO of Bridgestone-Firestone Inc. and three other executives to appear in the case of a couple who died when the tread reportedly came off their Firestone tires.

A lawyer for relatives of Patricio and Nidia Leal, who died in the accident in May, said he wants Chief Executive Officer Masatoshi Ono to explain in a deposition when the Tokyo-based company knew that there were problems with the Firestone tires that are being recalled.

Mr. Ono told the Wall Street Journal in an Aug. 18 story that the company knew there were problems with Wilderness tires when used under "severe conditions" and moved to improve the model before the recall.

Man guns down three, then kills himself

WATERBURY, Conn. A man went on a killing spree Saturday, gunning down three persons, including a firefighter who was collecting money for charity, before shooting himself to death, police said.

The gunman knew all three victims, but authorities hadn't determined why he targeted them. One victim was a neighbor and another was the mother of an ex-girlfriend.

The shooting spree began when the suspect, identified as Mark Cote, 29, got into an argument with Brian Miller, 30, police said. The two had an ongoing dispute, but police would not say why they were arguing Saturday.

Trial aims to shut neo-Nazi Aryan Nations

BOISE, Idaho For American neo-Nazis, northern Idaho's Hayden Lake is a modern Valhalla heart and homeland of the Aryan Nations, one of the most significant forces in the burgeoning U.S. white-supremacist movement.

But a civil trial opening in nearby Coeur D'Alene today aims to change all that.

The case, brought by the Southern Poverty Law Center on behalf of a local woman who claims Aryan Nations neo-Nazi security guards beat her and her son in 1998, is the latest in a series of legal moves aimed at crushing racist groups by bankrupting them.

The civil suit charges Aryan Nations' 83-year-old leader, Richard Butler, with recklessness and negligence in supervising his security force.

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