- The Washington Times - Thursday, December 21, 2000

Five fugitives added to bombing indictment

NEW YORK Five more fugitives were indicted yesterday in the 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies in Africa, raising the number of accused to 22.

The indictment portrayed the five new defendants as key members of a terrorism group reputedly led by exiled Saudi millionaire Osama bin Laden, who is accused of being the ringleader of a worldwide conspiracy targeting Americans.

The amended indictment also charges a defendant already in custody, Mamdouh Mahmud Salim, with attempted murder and other counts in an attack on a guard at a federal jail in New York. The guard was critically injured Nov. 1 when he was stabbed in the eye with a comb that had been filed down to a point.

Salim, 41, already was charged with conspiracy in the international plot to kill Americans. He pleaded not guilty yesterday to the new charges.

Palm Beach ballots are returning home

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. More than 430,000 ballots began the 400-mile truck ride back to Palm Beach County inside a rental truck yesterday.

Among the county's ballots stored inside 166 metal boxes and three brown cardboard boxes were the 30,000 at the center of last month's recount dispute between George W. Bush and Vice President Al Gore.

Circuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls ruled that they and another batch from Miami-Dade County that machines read as having no marked preference for president would not be divined for voter intent, and Mr. Bush eventually won Florida's 25 electoral votes.

Miami-Dade's ballots are to leave Tallahassee today.

Report: Giuliani, wife work on divorce terms

NEW YORK Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani has filed for divorce from actress Donna Hanover in a move long expected since the couple's public breakup during Mr. Giuliani's aborted U.S. Senate campaign earlier this year.

The New York Daily News yesterday, citing sources, said Mr. Giuliani officially filed for divorce and was negotiating terms of the split with his estranged wife before Acting State Supreme Court Justice Judith Gische.

The couple has two children, Andrew, 14, and Caroline, 11.

"I have no comment," Mr. Giuliani said yesterday. "All that, I consider private and I'm not going to discuss it."

Mrs. Hanover had no comment yesterday, and lawyers for both parties also declined to comment.

Suspect in slayings taken after standoff

LAKE PROVIDENCE, La. One of the FBI's Top 10 most wanted a man suspected in at least four slayings was captured yesterday after barricading himself in his father's home in a standoff with police.

Jesse James Caston, 35, who has been featured twice on "America's Most Wanted," was armed but surrendered peacefully after negotiating by telephone with SWAT team members and his father, James.

"I've been in hell," Mr. Caston told reporters as he was escorted to jail in shackles.

Mr. Caston was wanted in the slayings of James B. Kelly, 59, and his son, James M. "Bubba" Kelly, 37, who were found shot to death Monday on a Mississippi River levee.

Technical snag halts Jupiter observations

PASADENA, Calif. NASA suspended the Cassini spacecraft's observations of Jupiter yesterday because of a problem with a maneuvering system.

Cassini had been sending back images and other scientific data about Jupiter as it moves toward Saturn and its moon Titan on a $3.4 billion, U.S.-European mission.

Observations were halted after one of the spacecraft's four "reaction wheels" began to fail, causing Cassini to switch to a different maneuvering system.

The problem surfaced Sunday when the No. 2 reaction wheel began to need extra force to turn, and the spacecraft reacted by automatically switching from electricity to hydrazine fuel to maneuver. That hydrazine must be conserved for the primary mission at Saturn, according to officials.

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