- The Washington Times - Sunday, December 24, 2000

Books

• "What About Me?: When Brothers and Sisters Get Sick," by Dr. Allan Peterkin and illustrator Frances Middendorf, Magination Press, 1992. The story of Laura and her sick brother may help calm a child's fears about his or her sibling's illness.

m"Our Family Has Cancer, Too," by Christine Clifford and illustrator Jack Lindstrom, Pfeifer-Hamilton, 1994. The author's struggle with breast cancer is told from the perspective of her 15-year-old son.

Associations

• The American Cancer Society, National Capital Chapter, 1875 Connecticut Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20009. Phone: 202/483-2600. Web site: www.cancer.org. Besides offering medical information about cancer, the society can refer families to support groups and services for siblings.

• The National Children's Cancer Foundation, 440 E. Huntington Drive, PO Box 60012, Arcadia, Calif. 91066-6012. Phone: 800/458-NCCF. Web site: www.nccf.org. This nonprofit group's Web site has support information for families coping with childhood cancer.

On line

• OncoLink (http://cancer.med.upenn.edu), the extensive cancer information site run by the University of Pennsylvania Cancer Center, has a "Kid's Corner" page that can link readers to bulletin boards and e-mail lists of children who have cancer and their siblings.

• The Crossett family of Centreville has a Web site (www.celebraterachel.org) chronicling Rachel's two-year battle with neuroblastoma, an aggressive form of cancer. The site also links with other useful pages about cancer.

Miscellaneous

If you have a family member undergoing treatment for a chronic illness such as cancer, check with your medical center's social services department. Many hospitals have workshops and support groups for siblings and also have social workers and mental health professionals who can work with children and teens.

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