- The Washington Times - Monday, December 4, 2000

Musician sues Chuck Berry

ST. LOUIS "Roll Over Beethoven," "No Particular Place to Go" and "Sweet Little Sixteen" are among the songs that made Chuck Berry a rock 'n' roll legend.

But a lawsuit filed in St. Louis says Mr. Berry had help in his rise to stardom and should pay pianist Johnnie Johnson the money due him for co-writing those hits and about 50 other songs since 1955, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports.

The lawsuit, filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court, claims that Mr. Berry misled Mr. Johnson, 76, of St. Louis, into believing that he was entitled to no more than the pay he earned as a studio musician. Mr. Berry owes Mr. Johnson half of the "tens of millions of dollars in royalties, license fees and other payments" the songs have earned, the lawsuit contends.

Mr. Berry's lawyer, Martin Green, said he and Mr. Berry are stunned by the accusations in the lawsuit.

The lawsuit seeks unspecified actual and punitive damages from Mr. Berry and his Isalee Music Co.

New director named for Bush library

COLLEGE STATION, Texas A retired Air Force colonel and adviser to former President George Bush has been named director of the Bush Presidential Library and Museum.

Douglas Menarchik will replace the library's first director, David Alsobrook, who had been with the project since it began in 1993. Mr. Alsobrook has taken on the job of forming the library of President Clinton in Little Rock, Ark.

Mr. Menarchik, 53, heads the Center for Defense Leadership and Management Program at the National Defense University in Washington, D.C.

His association with Mr. Bush began when Mr. Bush was vice president. An expert on terrorism and Middle Eastern and African policies, he was selected in 1984 to work as Mr. Bush's military adviser, a position he kept until Mr. Bush became president in 1989.

Baby hurt when bullet rips through diaper

AURORA, Colo. Just 5 months old, Aleacia McKinney faced the biggest crisis of her life. A stray bullet hit her and glanced off her leg.

Jason McKinney, 25, and Cassie Hinton, 18, say they thank God their baby wasn't killed, Scripps Howard News Service reports.

On Friday afternoon, a 9 mm bullet entered the mobile home where Aleacia lives with her parents. The bullet tore through her diaper, wounding the curly haired infant on the inside of her right thigh. No one else in the home was injured.

Police said they think a road-rage confrontation between groups in two vehicles led to the shooting.

Sierra Nevada logging to be suspended

SACRAMENTO, Calif. The U.S. Forest Service is to halt timber sales and most harvesting from forests in the Sierra Nevada and nearby ranges, the Sacramento Bee reported.

The nearly three-month suspension, to begin Dec. 11, comes almost two months after a coalition of environmentalists sued the Forest Service in a bid to protect the habitat of the California spotted owl and the Pacific fisher, a small, furry tree-dwelling weasel.

It will affect operations across 11 million acres of California and Nevada forest.

Presbyterians condemn Confederate emblem

ATLANTA The Presbytery of Greater Atlanta, the local representative body of the Presbyterian Church USA, has approved a resolution saying the Confederate symbol on Georgia's state flag "has served to pull the community apart."

Lawmakers changed the flag in 1956 to include the Confederate symbol in response to court-ordered integration in the South, the resolution said.

The Presbyterians joined the Atlanta diocese of the Episcopal Church and the Southeastern Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, which both recently called for a change in the flag.

The North Georgia Conference of the United Methodist Church, the denomination of Gov. Roy Barnes and Sen. Zell Miller, Georgia Democrat, passed a similar resolution in 1992.

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