- The Washington Times - Wednesday, February 23, 2000

John 16:3

The Internet is proving, once again, to have a shelf life of its own. The question now is whether subscribers are pulling the more classic selections off the fiction shelf.
It was just four months ago that Republican presidential hopeful Sen. Orrin G. Hatch of Utah appeared before a Christian Coalition gathering in Washington and poked fun at Vice President Al Gore for giving a speech on the importance of faith.
"As proof, he related that his favorite Bible verse is John 16:3," Mr. Hatch observed, noting that the vice president surely meant to say John 3:16, which promises everlasting life to those who believe in God.
Then, for the benefit of his audience not to mention his own political aspirations Mr. Hatch quoted John 16:3: "And these things will they do unto you because they have not known the Father or me."
"No one in the vice president's office was familiar enough with the Scriptures to catch the error," Mr. Hatch continued. "The irony is, if Dan Quayle had said this, the media would have been all over him. But, of course, would any reporter have the Bible to check it out?"
Mr. Hatch, who could not be reached yesterday, didn't cite a source for his information, nor did he mention in what speech Mr. Gore uttered the apparent blooper. Perhaps he didn't know.
"It absolutely never happened," Gore campaign spokesman Chris Lehane told Inside the Beltway in an interview yesterday. "It appears that some of these folks have spent too much time at Bob Jones University, because they clearly can't tell facts from fiction."
Unlike the mainstream media, much of the material disseminated over the Internet, particularly of political scope, is neither sourced, nor checked for accuracy.
"With specific regards to the Internet, people are intelligent and smart enough to evaluate things on their own," Mr. Lehane believes. Still, this isn't the first time Mr. Gore has been burned by the Internet an "educational" tool he's strived hard to hook up to every school in the nation.
"Another example took place last summer," Mr. Lehane says. "These [Internet] people ran a list of so-called 'Goreisms,' ridiculous comments attributed to Mr. Gore. When in fact every one of them, it turns out, were Dan Quayle's comments."

Catch 22

"Twenty-two days and counting," Matthew Glavin, president of the Southeastern Legal Foundation in Atlanta, tells Inside the Beltway in a telephone interview. "What are you going to do, Mr. President?"
The Arkansas Supreme Court recently gave President Clinton 30 days to respond to an ethics complaint filed by the foundation seeking to have Mr. Clinton stripped of his license to practice law for lying and obstructing justice.
"The rules are very clear," Mr. Glavin reiterated yesterday, saying Mr. Clinton's failure to respond "shall constitute separate and distinct grounds for the imposition of sanctions."
Worse yet, failing to respond would constitute an admission of guilt, as alleged in the complaint.

Show mom the money

"Twenty-two days and counting," Matthew Glavin, president of the Southeastern Legal Foundation in Atlanta, tells Inside the Beltway in a telephone interview. "What are you going to do, Mr. President?"
The Arkansas Supreme Court recently gave President Clinton 30 days to respond to an ethics complaint filed by the foundation seeking to have Mr. Clinton stripped of his license to practice law for lying and obstructing justice.
"The rules are very clear," Mr. Glavin reiterated yesterday, saying Mr. Clinton's failure to respond "shall constitute separate and distinct grounds for the imposition of sanctions."
Worse yet, failing to respond would constitute an admission of guilt, as alleged in the complaint.Show mom the moneyWhen it comes to young people, worries of Americans have moved from drugs, violence and teen pregnancy to too many children lacking a sense of right and wrong, respect for authority and responsibility for their actions.
And parents, especially mothers, may be to blame.
Such is the conclusion of National Issues Forums, finding many teens and children struggling because they haven't been instilled with proper moral and ethical behavior.
Participants quoted in the "NIF Report on the Issues 2000" describe children as suffering from "a sense of drift" and "a big disconnect" with society.
"It's just amazing, the degradation of their view of normal behavior," a teacher from Rapid City, S.D., told the forum.
While a teacher from Englewood, N.J., blamed parents, especially mothers overly preoccupied with themselves: "Right now it seems like everything's about money. You get these very wealthy mothers who couldn't care less about raising their children. They want their Porsche and they want big diamonds and furs.
"I'm a teacher. I've taught at a very, very exclusive private school for children who are very rich and at public schools for people who were very, very poor. You have very rich children with the same problem as very poor children absentee parents."

Animal alias

We're not sure what President Clinton has been up to lately, but we have it on good authority that Tricia "Trish" Trupo the struggling New York waitress stiffed by Hillary Rodham Clinton two weeks ago after the first lady devoured two orders of scrambled eggs, home fries and rye toast received two suspicious envelopes in the mail.
Postmarked by the post office nearest the White House, the first envelope contained a DC Powerball lottery ticket, with "Socks the Cat" scribbled as the return address. A $5 bill was tucked into the second envelope, licked shut and mailed by "Buddy the Dog."

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