- The Washington Times - Tuesday, July 18, 2000

Fairfax County, Va., police announced yesterday they have preserved DNA evidence from the slaying three years ago of a Vienna-area couple evidence that cleared, once and for all, the couple's adopted son, Clint Quisenberry.
It is not unusual in cases where both parents are killed for the initial police investigation to focus on family members, police said. Mr. Quisenberry seemed to understand that the brief suspicion that fell on him was just routine.
He flew in from Texas yesterday morning to appear at a joint press conference with top Fairfax police officials, where he announced he is doubling the reward from $30,000 to $60,000 for information leading to the arrest and indictment of the persons responsible for killing his parents, Bobby Ray Quisenberry and Patricia Anne Quisenberry.
"It's tough to know they were taken for no reason at all," said Clint Quisenberry, 29, of College Station, Texas. "They weren't in the wrong place at the wrong time. They didn't offend anyone. They were asleep in their beds.
"Hopefully somebody will help and come forward to put my parents' case to rest."
The Quisenberrys were shot to death July 11, 1997, in their Vienna town house.
Police now believe that more than one person was involved, and that robbery played a part.
The thieves stole three gold rings, a pair of Nikon compact binoculars, a Sony compact video recorder, a .22-caliber handgun and the couple's 1996 Oldsmobile Aurora, which was dumped behind a Camp Springs apartment complex in Prince George's County, Md.
The car was found three days later. The stolen property is still missing.
Police announced they did not come away empty-handed. They obtained DNA material from a work glove found in the Quisenberrys' vehicle that did not belong to the couple or their son.
The ivory-colored glove provides a large enough sample that police can match it with the DNA of the killers, if or when they are found.
They did not find enough DNA to run a match-search through a computer database they were only able to complete five steps of the 13-step process but they collected enough to help convict the killers one day, Detective Robert Murphy said.
Police collected the DNA from the glove when they searched the car days later, but took steps to preserve the DNA. Virginia has no statute of limitations for a capital murder charge.
"The DNA evidence is very powerful," Capt. John Tomaselli said.
Mr. Quisenberry, who was a suspect until the discovery of the glove, hopes more money will produce badly needed witnesses to any aspect of the slayings that leads to an arrest and indictment.
Fairfax County CrimeSolvers offers an additional $1,000 reward for the same information.
The Fairfax police asked the FBI to assemble likely profiles of the killers and the case. The profiles turned up the following:
c To or more persons committed the crime.
c The killers knew where the Quisenberrys lived and the area where the car was dumped some 20 miles away.
c The killers know how the court system works.
"The suspects have become very good at eluding the system right now," Capt. Tomaselli said. "But we have not given up on this case. We are working to gather any information that we can."
Police have never stopped working on the case, Capt. Tomaselli said, and decided to release the information in conjunction with Mr. Quisenberry's doubling of the reward.
"It's been difficult, I won't lie," Mr. Quisenberry said of losing his parents. "I had some of the best parents. From the moment they adopted me, I had a very close relationship with them. The day before they died, I saw them, and I've never seen them happier than they were that evening."
Police urge anyone with information about the crime to contact Detective Murphy at 703/246-7857 or CrimeSolvers at 800/673-2777.

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