- The Washington Times - Thursday, July 27, 2000

Suharto to be charged with corruption

JAKARTA, Indonesia Former President Suharto will be charged with corruption and pilfering more than $150 million in state funds through a maze of personally controlled charities, prosecutors said yesterday.
The former dictator faces life in prison if found guilty, although he has been offered a pardon by the reformist head of state, Abdurrahman Wahid, if he returns the money.
Suharto, 79, ruled Indonesia with an iron hand for 32 years until 1998. He is now under house arrest at his Jakarta home.

Fujimori win marred by street protests

LIMA, Peru Amid huge street protests yesterday, Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori named a former opposition presidential candidate as prime minister in a move expected to improve his democratic credentials after winning a fraud-tainted election.
Federico Salas, mayor of one of Peru's poorest provinces who campaigned in this year's elections against government centralism, replaces Alberto Bustamante, who headed the Cabinet for about a year.
The nomination came as Mr. Fujimori faced one of his biggest demonstrations in years by the opposition led by defeated presidential candidate Alejandro Toledo.

Ireland killers freed in peace deal

BELFAST By week's end, when most of the remaining inmates file out of Northern Ireland's anti-terrorist Maze prison, the murderers and bombers who made headlines and broke families' hearts during 30 years of sectarian strife will be free men.
Among them: The Irish Republican Army sniper who shot the last British soldier killed in Northern Ireland; the bomber who massacred nine persons in a Protestant fish shop and the Protestant who killed seven persons in retaliation; and the IRA man who bombed London's Docklands area, killing two.
All of them a total of 86 prisoners are to receive early paroles Friday, the beneficiaries of Northern Ireland's 1998 peace agreement.

Greek commandos free hostages

NAFPLION, Greece Elite coast guard divers stormed a sailboat yesterday, killing a gunman who held a Swiss family of five and the boat's captain hostage for 14 hours, officials said.
All six captives who included a woman in a wheelchair and her toddler son were unharmed, the Merchant Marine Ministry said. One coast guard officer was wounded in a shootout with the gunman, witnesses said.
The gunman, reportedly Czech, hijacked the boat at 6 a.m., forcing it to sail away from the port in Nafplion, about 90 miles south of Athens.

Ivory Coast OKs new constitution

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast In a landslide vote, Ivory Coast residents approved a new constitution billed as a first step to return the West African nation to civilian rule, according to final results Tuesday.
But opponents of the referendum voted on Sunday and Monday worried that the new charter will legally enshrine growing anti-foreigner sentiment and ethnic tensions.
Returns from all 58 voting districts showed 86.5 percent backing the constitution, with 13.5 percent against.

Retiring Boothroyd raps female MPs

LONDON Betty Boothroyd, who retires as speaker of the House of Commons in October, took a parting swipe yesterday at the new intake of female lawmakers who have demanded more "family friendly" hours in Parliament.
Miss Boothroyd, 70, a strong defender of the traditions and role of Parliament, suggested that some female legislators were putting their home life above their duty to the government.
A record 121 women were elected in 1997. Many have been critical of working conditions and hours in the House of Commons, and several with young children have said they intend to stand down at the next election rather than mix parliamentary careers with family life.
Earlier this year, Miss Boothroyd who has never married rejected demands for mothers to be able to breast-feed anywhere in the House.

From wire dispatches and staff reports

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