- The Washington Times - Friday, June 16, 2000

NATO troops search for arms in Kosovo

PRISTINA, Yugoslavia Concerned over an increase in armed attacks in Kosovo, NATO peacekeepers began a major raid Thursday in an ethnic Albanian stronghold, seizing a large quantity of weapons and ammunition.
The operation followed the killing of two Serbs and wounding of another on a road south of Pristina.
To curb such attacks, about 400 British and other troops began a house-to-house search at dawn in the Drenica region.

Canada's high court upholds gun law

OTTAWA Canada's controversial gun-registration law, enacted in the aftermath of a massacre of 14 young women by a lone gunman a decade ago in Montreal, was upheld unanimously by the country's Supreme Court Thursday.
The high court ruled in a 9-0 decision that the federal government had the right to protect public safety under its authority to enact criminal law.
The federal government now faces the challenge of getting reluctant gun owners to comply with its 1995 law which extends Canada's gun laws to include the mandatory registration of rifles and shotguns, not just handguns.

Zimbabwe's Mugabe may seize mining

HARARE, Zimbabwe A threat by Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe to seize the assets of foreign mining companies dealt a further blow to investor confidence Thursday in a country already suffering political and economic turmoil.
Mr. Mugabe, whose party faces its stiffest challenge in 20 unbroken years in power, told Britain's Independent newspaper that once the issue of transferring many white-owned farms to black peasants was settled, he would turn to the mining sector.
Mr. Mugabe's comments drew disbelief and dire warnings from an industry that contributes 8 percent to Zimbabwe's gross domestic product.

Militants feared to be targeting U.S.

OTTAWA Sunni Muslim extremists, including supporters of Saudi terrorism suspect Osama bin Laden, now appear to be using Canada as a base to launch attacks in the United States, the Canadian counterintelligence agency said Thursday.
In its annual report, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service said Canada's open society and proximity to the United States meant the country was becoming an increasingly attractive base for foreign terrorists.

Carlos the Jackal says Syria an old friend

PARIS Convicted international guerrilla "Carlos the Jackal" said in a statement from prison Thursday his band of feared revolutionaries had been given diplomatic passports by Syria during the years of some of its main actions.
The letter, forwarded to Reuters news agency by Carlos' attorney, was in the Venezuelan-born guerrilla's handwriting and dated from La Sante prison in Paris where he is serving a life sentence for killing three persons, including two French policemen, in 1975.
"President [Hafez] al-Assad sent an envoy to Baghdad in autumn 1978 to invite me and my comrades to Syria," wrote Carlos, saying he was writing in the name of the "Organization of International Revolutionaries." Mr. Assad died last Saturday.
Carlos, born Illich Ramirez Sanchez, wrote that he first visited Syria in 1979 and that Vice President Abdel Halim Khaddam, "during his tenure as foreign minister, was in charge of issuing diplomatic passports to the cadres of our organization."

U.N. presses Haiti on election results

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan has pressed Haiti's election organizers to recalculate the results in the country's recent parliamentary elections, saying he was "troubled by continuing irregularities" in the vote counting.
The May 21 election, Haiti's first national vote in more than three years, was considered a critical step in the impoverished Caribbean nation's struggle to build a stable democracy after decades of dictatorship and military rule.

From wire dispatches and staff reports

LOAD COMMENTS ()

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide