- The Washington Times - Thursday, May 11, 2000

The pill, then and now

"After the [birth-control] pill's approval, Reader's Digest predicted 'one vast, all-pervading sexological spree.' Condemned and praised, the pill became the symbol of reproductive freedom for women.

"For young women embarking on new lives after high school and college, there was now the opportunity to make choices about sex. That individual freedom became a hallmark of the '60s, or so it seemed… .

"In its first two years on the market by G.D. Searle Co., the pill was taken by more than 1.2 million women; today, more than 100 million women worldwide rely on oral contraceptives to prevent ovulation… .

"Nora Ephron, the author and screenwriter, recalls getting the pill for the first time at the Margaret Sanger clinic after moving to New York City in 1962. She was single, but lied to a nurse that she was engaged.

" 'All I knew about the pill was that it had been tested on several thousand Puerto Rican women and not one of them had had a child in years,' she wrote in 1977 in an essay on the '60s titled 'The Pill and I.' …

"Ephron was not alone. By 1960, 30.5 percent of married women were working outside the home, and by 1965, 35 percent of the work force was female. They wanted to decide themselves when to start their families."

Ellen Mazo, writing on "The Pill at 40," Tuesday in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

American police state

"We have now become aware that Planned Parenthood, through the National Abortion Federation, has been maintaining a list of all pro-life gatherings, including the benefit concerts for crisis-pregnancy centers run by Rock For Life… .

"Planned Parenthood takes the list, adds it to a report titled 'Clinic Violence Report' and … sends it to police agencies across the country. American Life League recently received calls from the state police in Alabama and Maryland, stating they had received this report and asking about Rock For Life's concerts.

"It appears that Planned Parenthood wishes to turn America into a police state where any activity they do not expressly endorse must be monitored by the police. And it is not just specific pro-life groups that Planned Parenthood fears. On the list sent to Alabama police were several Promise Keepers meetings… .

"Planned Parenthood is now using the police to keep tabs on its opposition."

Jim Sedlak, director of Stop Planned Parenthood International, in a May 4 press release

Segregated media elite

" 'Suburban sprawl.' 'The digital divide.' 'Haves and have-nots.' An undercurrent of racism runs through all these pet issues of the media elite. The message, if veiled, is meant for rich whites: You're the problem… .

"To hear Ted Koppel and Christopher Matthews the self-anointed, prime-time champions of racial equality tensions between blacks and whites are at a boiling point. And continued segregation is to blame.

" 'This is 40 years after we passed the civil-rights bill, and still the country is basically white here and black over there,' bellowed Matthews on a recent broadcast of his 'Hardball' show on CNBC. 'There's 'hoods, there's ghettos, and there's whites living in the 'burbs. It hasn't changed a lick.'

"Why the divide? The country is still 'run by white guys,' Matthews said… .

"Matthews should know. After lecturing everyone else on racial harmony, he seeks refuge in a mostly white ZIP code in the leafy 'burbs of Chevy Chase, Md… .

"His $1.1 million home with its four-and-a-half baths, two fireplaces and 3,750 square feet is nowhere near the 'ghettos.' …

"Knowing where these out-of-touch, guilt-racked media elite live helps explain why they keep picking at the old scab of racism, when both whites and blacks have moved on."

Paul Sperry, writing on "Desegregate the Media Elite," in Front Page magazine at www.frontpagemag.com

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