- The Washington Times - Sunday, November 26, 2000

Books

• "Active Youth: Ideas for Implementing the CDC's Physical Activity Guidelines," by Patricia Sammann, Human Kinetics, 1998. This book has a plethora of ideas for fun family fitness.

• "50 Simple Things You Can Do to Raise a Child Who Is Physically Fit," by Keith Burridge and Joanne Landy, Arco Publishing, 1997. This book offers fun activities for 3- to 8-year-olds.

• "Exercise Is Fun," by Tamara Green, Gareth Stevens, 1998. This book is aimed at getting preteens moving.

• "Fitness Education for Children: A Team Approach," by Stephen J. Virgilio, Human Kinetics, 1997. This textbook says that parents, classroom teachers, physical education teachers and the community need to work together to raise healthy children.

Associations

• National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE), 1900 Association Drive, Reston, Va. 20191. Phone: 800/213-7193. Web site: www.aahperd.org/naspe. This organization oversees physical education in kindergarten through 12th grade. It has statistics on the state of physical education in this country as well as guidelines, advice and survey results.

On line

• Shape Up America, the nonprofit fitness organization founded by former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, has a Web site (www.shapeup.org) that provides a range of ideas for getting children to be more active, including the on-line brochure "99 Tips for Family Fitness Fun."

• Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association and National Sporting Goods Association have teamed up to create a Web site (www.weneedpe.com). The site details how physical education requirements vary from state to state and offers up-to-date information on the Physical Education for Progress (PEP) Act, introduced recently by Sen. Ted Stevens, Alaska Republican.

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