- The Washington Times - Friday, November 3, 2000

Lawyer admits mistake in Lewinsky probe

A former White House lawyer told a federal judge yesterday she "made a mistake" when she belatedly included a White House memo concerning Monica Lewinsky in a packet of documents she turned over to the independent counsel's office.

Michelle Peterson told U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth the memo had been discovered by others at the White House and she included it in a batch of separate records she already had prepared for prosecutors, but forgot to make a note of it in a cover letter.

The independent counsel was investigating Miss Lewinsky's relationship with President Clinton, who first denied and then later admitted having an improper sexual relationship with the former intern. The memo outlined reasons for Miss Lewinsky's move to the Pentagon, including a notation concerning "extracurricular activities" at the White House.

Police say suspects videotaped gang rape

MARIETTA, Ga. The suspects accused of raping and molesting a 13-year-old mentally disabled girl videotaped part of the crime, authorities said.

District Attorney Pat Head would not say what the videotape revealed, but said he did not plan to show it to the grand jury.

Up to 25 males ages 12 to 25 raped and molested the girl for 12 hours after luring her off of a bicycle and into an apartment building, police said Wednesday.

Eight suspects have been arrested and warrants were issued for three others sought in the Oct. 13-14 attack.

Lawyer in capital case sabotaged appeals

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. A lawyer for a death-row inmate has stepped forward and admitted sabotaging his client's appeals because he didn't like the man and thought he ought to be executed.

The disclosure came Wednesday in the case of 34-year-old Russell Tucker, who is scheduled to die Dec. 7 for the 1994 murder of a security guard.

A remorseful David B. Smith said he caused his co-counsel to miss a key state Supreme Court deadline for filing an appeal.

"I decided that Mr. Tucker deserved to die, and I would not do anything to prevent his execution," Mr. Smith said in a recent affidavit.

Co-counsel Steven Allen asked a Superior Court judge Wednesday to let the appeal be heard and name new lawyers for Tucker. But the judge said both questions are up to the Supreme Court.

Catholic bishop backs homosexual rights plan

PORTLAND, Maine Maine Catholics have their bishop's blessing to vote for a ballot measure Tuesday that would ban discrimination in housing, credit and employment on the basis of sexual orientation.

Bishop Joseph Gerry of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Portland has backed a homosexual rights measure that would make a distinction between sexual orientation or sexual behavior. The Catholic Church considers sex outside of marriage a sin.

Religious groups would be exempt, but church agencies that get government money such as hospitals would lose it unless they complied.

Iraqi scientist got data from '40s atomic bomb

A former high-ranking official in Iraq's nuclear weapons program says Baghdad has the design capability to build an atomic bomb, with help from a surprising source: Library copies of reports on the Manhattan Project that built the U.S. bombs that were dropped on Japan.

"I found a nice gift from the U.S. Atomic Energy Project at the library the Manhattan Project report," Khidhir Hamza, a nuclear physicist who defected in 1994, said yesterday in a rare public appearance.

One of only three or four nuclear physicists in Iraq when the bomb project began in the 1970s, he says he found the reports at Iraq's atomic energy library "in a corner with a pile of dust on them … sitting there telling me exactly what to do."

The physicist also told his audience at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace that Iraq has designed a bomb and has the equipment to build it but lacks the necessary uranium or other fissile material.

LOAD COMMENTS ()

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide