- The Washington Times - Monday, November 6, 2000

Opposition seeking probe of Fujimori

LIMA, Peru Opposition leaders are fighting to ensure that a probe into allegations that Peru's ex-spy chief laundered more than $48 million through Swiss banks includes his former ally, President Alberto Fujimori.
"This $48 million that was just discovered is only the tip of a much larger tangled mess," opposition leader Alejandro Toledo told a rally Saturday night in the southern Andean city of Cuzco. "I have no doubt that soon the bank accounts of Fujimori … will be revealed."
Mr. Fujimori appointed a special prosecutor last week to investigate his fugitive ex-intelligence adviser Vladimiro Montesinos after Swiss authorities told Peru they had frozen five accounts on Oct. 5 linked to Mr. Montesinos.

Malaysian police block, arrest protesters

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia Police fired tear gas, swung batons and sprayed chemical-laced water from trucks yesterday to break up Malaysia's biggest anti-government protest in recent months.
Led by the country's top opposition leaders, thousands of people blocked a major expressway linking Kuala Lumpur, the capital, to a neighboring state and shouted slogans against Prime Minister Mahathir Mohammed.
More than 30 people were arrested in the protest. Demonstrators called for greater democracy and the release of Anwar Ibrahim, Malaysia's imprisoned former deputy prime minister.

Weekend clashes kill two, wound five

MOGADISHU, Somalia Weekend clashes between gunmen and government supporters killed two persons and injured five, witnesses said, in a reminder of Somalia's new government struggle to deal with faction leaders opposed to the country's peace process.
The fighting took place in the central town of Baidoa late Saturday after gunmen employed by faction leader Hassan Mohammed Nur surrounded the houses of the government supporters.
President Abdiqasim Salad Hassan and a 245-member assembly were elected in neighboring Djibouti in August.

Troops, police fire on protesters

FREETOWN, Sierra Leone U.N. peacekeepers and Sierra Leone police opened fire yesterday to disperse hundreds of tire-burning youths demanding the lifting of a curfew, witnesses said. At least 13 civilians were wounded.
British soldiers tried to calm the pre-dawn demonstration stemming from public anger over a spate of armed robberies during curfew hours, which the government of this war-ravaged West African nation has imposed in a bid to prevent rebel attacks.
Witnesses said armored-car loads of police and Nigerian U.N. peacekeepers tried to scatter the surging crowd by firing automatic rifles mostly in the air but sometimes in the direction of the protesters.

Estrada denies U.S. pressuring him to quit

MANILA Embattled President Joseph Estrada, facing threats of impeachment over a gambling payoffs scandal, denied yesterday that there had been pressure from the United States for him to resign.
"The United States does not interfere in our affairs. All they want to happen is for our constitution to be followed," Mr. Estrada, who had talks recently with senior U.S. Embassy officials, said in a radio interview.
Mr. Estrada faces the prospects of more defections from his ruling coalition as the House of Representatives, or lower house, begins formal discussions today on an opposition motion calling for his impeachment.

Iran's lawmakers battle over media freedoms

TEHRAN Iran's reformist-dominated parliament approved a bill yesterday to block courts from closing newspapers, after hard-liners rejected similar legislation last week.
The move is another challenge by reformist allies of President Mohammed Khatami to Islamic conservatives who have shut down more than 30 publications in the past six months, nearly all pro-democracy newspapers.

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