- The Washington Times - Tuesday, November 7, 2000

Washington-area voters will go to the polls today to decide a handful of ballot issues and pick who will represent them in Congress.
In the District of Columbia, residents will directly elect a school board president for the first time ever, as well as elect 10 city council members and four school board members.
Voters in the suburbs also will be asked to approve changes to the state constitutions and, in Maryland's suburbs, to impose or remove term limits.
Most area schools are closed today. Only D.C., Arlington, Alexandria and Falls Church, Va., schools are open.
Polls are open in Maryland and the District from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.
In Virginia, the polls are open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. as always, but voters will face many other changes.
All voters will be required to show identification at the polls or sign an affidavit affirming that they are who they claim to be. Acceptable identification includes a valid Virginia driver's license; a Virginia voter card; a Social Security card, an ID issued by the federal government, Virginia or one of its municipalities; or an employer-issued ID card that has a photo of the voter.
And, for the first time, the ballot will show the party affiliation of all candidates for federal office.
In Virginia's Senate race, incumbent Charles S. Robb, the only Democrat in statewide office, is trying to fend off former Gov. George F. Allen, a Republican.
Both men crisscrossed the state yesterday to energize voters.
"We have seen it, we have felt it from Hampton Roads to the great Southwest, where we were yesterday, from Richmond to right here in Northern Virginia Democrats are ready to fight, Democrats are ready to vote, Democrats are ready to win," Mr. Robb, 61, said at a noon rally in Market Square in Alexandria yesterday.
Mr. Allen had a rally at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport before hitting other areas of the state.
"We're on the 2-yard line, and we need one more push from you to get across the goal line for the score and the victory," Mr. Allen, 48, told more than 200 boisterous backers in Norfolk.
Maryland voters will also elect a senator, choosing between incumbent Paul S. Sarbanes, a Democrat seeking his fifth term, and Paul H. Rappaport, the Republican challenger.
The region's U.S. House races lack the intensity of Virginia's Senate race, as most incumbents are heavily favored.
In Virginia, Republicans Thomas M. Davis III in the 11th District and Frank R. Wolf in the 10th District and Democrat James P. Moran Jr. in the 8th District are all likely to be re-elected.
In Maryland, incumbent Republican Constance A. Morella is facing off against Terry Lierman in the 8th District. Bennett Bozman, a Democrat, is challenging Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest, a Republican, in the 1st District. Incumbent Democrat Albert R. Wynn faces Republican John B. Kimble in the 4th District; and Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, a Democrat, is running against Thomas E. "Tim" Hutchins, a Republican, in the 5th District.
Virginia voters will be asked to approve two changes to the state constitution. One amendment would require that net proceeds from the state lottery go to localities for education spending. The other would enshrine in the constitution the right to hunt, fish or harvest game, subject to laws passed by the General Assembly.
Montgomery County, Md., voters will decide whether to impose term limits on elected county officials. Voters in Prince George's County, Md., are asked whether to get rid of their two-term limits on county officials.
D.C. voters will select members for all eight wards of the city council and choose from six candidates for two at-large seats. They also will choose a delegate to Congress.
Jabeen Bhatti, Daniel F. Drummond, Margie Hyslop, Gerald Mizejewski and Clarence Williams contributed to this article, which is based in part on wire service reports.

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