- The Washington Times - Thursday, October 12, 2000

Homosexuals reject Schlessinger apology

LOS ANGELES "Dr. Laura" Schlessinger used the Jewish Yom Kippur holiday to apologize to homosexuals for "poorly chosen" words, a gesture that a leading homosexual group promptly rejected.
"On the Day of Atonement, Jews are commanded to seek forgiveness from people we have hurt," the radio and TV talk-show host, who is Jewish, said in a newspaper ad included in a special "Gay Hollywood" edition of Daily Variety. "I deeply regret the hurt this situation has caused the gay and lesbian community."
She has been attacked for referring to homosexuality as a "biological error" and "deviant."
This was not enough for the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation.
"Laura Schlessinger once again blames others for the impact of her rhetoric," said executive director Joan M. Garry. "The anger Schlessinger's words have caused is too great and too profound to simply go away after a qualified admission of some guilt."

Many leaving reserves to avoid anthrax shots

Countering military assertions that refusals to take the anthrax vaccine are having little impact, a congressional study finds it is the leading cause cited by pilots and air-crew members for leaving National Guard and reserve units.
The Pentagon questioned the results yesterday, saying guard and reserve strength and readiness is unaffected. But officers acknowledged they have no data of their own on how many reservists are leaving rather than taking the shots.
In the General Accounting Office survey, 25 percent of those who left their units, either through requested transfer or resignation, cited the mandatory anthrax immunization as the No. 1 factor in their decision.

Space shuttle launched after week of delays

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. The space shuttle Discovery roared off the launch pad last night on an ambitious construction mission to the International Space Station, marking the 100th launch of the shuttle program.

The seven astronauts have a complex job ahead, adding two segments to the International Space Station and doing four spacewalks on consecutive days.

The first is a new docking port for use on future shuttle missions. The second is the base piece of an enormous array of solar-paneled "wings" that eventually will spread over the entire station.

Rain and dark clouds moved away from Cape Canaveral about an hour before launch, ending a week of bad weather and hardware woes grounding the orbiter.

Husband, wife found dead in swimming pool

BEXLEY, Ohio A husband and wife were found dead in their swimming pool yesterday, leaving behind two notes asking relatives to take care of their five children, police said.
The children, ages 3 to 10, were asleep in the family's two-story suburban Columbus house.
Detective Bob Cull said investigators suspect that Billy Matthews, 42, hit Kelly Matthews, 41, in the head and held her under the water, then drowned himself. He was found in the deep end with cinder blocks taped to his feet and legs.
Billy Matthews had called his father-in-law, Larry Metz, about 3 a.m. yesterday to ask that he come stay with the children while Mr. Matthews took his wife to the hospital, Detective Cull said. The husband told Mr. Metz she was vomiting.

Life-jacket case ends in manslaughter verdict

BRANDON, Miss. A man was convicted of a reduced charge of manslaughter yesterday for wresting a 7-year-old girl's life jacket from her and leaving her to drown in a Mississippi lake.
Troy Carlisle, 28, told authorities he was trying to save Dallas Reinhardt when he removed her life jacket to pull her to shore.
But Mr. Carlisle also testified that he knew the girl would die.
Kerri Peeples, the child's mother, screamed as she left the courthouse, "This is not justice. He murdered my child."
Mr. Carlisle faces a maximum 20-year prison sentence at his Oct. 20 sentencing. He could have received life in prison if convicted of murder.

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