- The Washington Times - Thursday, October 5, 2000

The Vermont revolt

Vermont Republicans turned out in record numbers for last month's primary elections and ousted 11 legislators who had voted to allow homosexual "civil unions" in the state, but the people of Vermont have just begun their fight.
"Even Gov. Howard Dean, a Democrat once considered a certainty for an unprecedented fifth term, is in trouble," USA Today reports. "If his Republican and Vermont Progressive Party rivals together get more than 50 percent of the vote, the election would be determined by the new, presumably more conservative state legislature."
Peter Shumlin, a Democrat and president of the state Senate, told reporter Fred Bayles that the coming election could have national implications.
"If we get thrown out, no other state legislature or governor will have the political will to pass a civil-union law for many, many years," said Mr. Shumlin, who is in a tough election contest.

Mother Gore

Vice President Al Gore spent a bit too much time in the makeup chair before Tuesday night's debate, according to TV game-show host and American Spectator columnist Ben Stein.
"Gore was comically overmade up, I guess because he was so nervous about sweating," Mr. Stein wrote in Salon.com, an on-line magazine. "I work in show business every day, and I don't think that I've seen that much makeup on anyone besides a Las Vegas showgirl. I kept waiting for his false eyelashes to fall off."
And whether it was a reference to the vice president's makeup or his sighing, grimacing responses to Texas Gov. George W. Bush's answers, the Boston Globe reported that Missouri voter Patti McCormick said of Mr. Gore: "My God, he sounds like my mother used to."

Debate panel under fire

A day after being barred from the first presidential debate, Ralph Nader called for an end to the commission sponsoring them and threatened legal action.
At a rally yesterday with 600 people at the University of Hartford in Connecticut, the Green Party presidential candidate blasted "the winner-take-all, two-party duopoly."
He also spoke harshly about Democratic vice-presidential candidate Joseph I. Lieberman, calling him a "political sorcerer," the Associated Press reported.
Speaking to the media, Mr. Nader showed off the ticket he obtained for the debate Tuesday night in Boston. But an official from the Commission on Presidential Debates stopped him from entering the debate hall, saying he was an uninvited guest. He also was not allowed to watch the debate on television in a nearby room.
"This is a political exclusion. They dismissed me for political reasons, not because I was disruptive. I'm never disruptive," he said. "That's got to be the worst mistake the debate commission ever made."
Speaking later in New London, Mr. Nader demanded that the commission apologize and donate $25,000 to Harvard Law School's clinic for electoral reform "or I'll pursue my legal remedies in court."
Meanwhile, in Boston, the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals scheduled a hearing for today before a three-judge panel on Mr. Nader's challenge to corporate sponsorship of the debates.
The court agreed to an expedited review of his lawsuit, which a lower court rejected last month.

Buchanan's plan

With his prospects of winning the presidential election remote, Reform Party nominee Pat Buchanan said Tuesday he would spend what was left of his $12.6 million in federal campaign funds to ensure the party got enough votes to qualify for the money again in 2004.
Mr. Buchanan, who is at barely 1 percent in most national polls, said he would target states written off by Republican nominee George W. Bush and urge people to vote for him to ensure the Reform Party got above the 5 percent vote threshold needed to receive federal funding, Reuters reports.
Mr. Buchanan, meeting with reporters in Boston, named Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, New York, Minnesota and Maryland as states the Reform Party would target. He predicted the Bush camp would soon give up on California and New Jersey as well.

Crusading sheriff loses

A Florida sheriff known for using his office to promote views on abortion and religion lost a Republican-primary runoff Tuesday to one of his former officers.

Rod Shoap had 29,720 votes, or 68 percent, compared with Lee County Sheriff John McDougall's 14,062 votes, or 32 percent, the Associated Press reports.

During the campaign, Sheriff McDougall drew criticism for the manner in which he crusades against abortion and promotes religion. Mr. Shoap attacked him for annual budget fights with the county commissioners.

Mr. Shoap is a major who resigned to run for sheriff after 22 years in the department.

Sheriff McDougall, who has been in office 12 years, once called an abortion doctor seeking police protection from demonstrators a "baby killer" and said he would protect the protesters' right to free speech.

He upset organizers of the annual Edison Festival of Light parade by displaying an anti-abortion sign from his car, breaking the rule banning political statements during the event.

And when then-Gov. Lawton Chiles vetoed a bill to create a "Choose Life" license plate two years ago year, Sheriff McDougall made up 250 of his own. He kept one on display in his office in the hands of a Virgin Mary statue.

Clinton's bad luck

President Clinton hunted for a television to watch Tuesday's presidential debate after his hotel lost cable service, first visiting the hotel bar and then braving a driving rainstorm to watch at a friend's home.
Mr. Clinton had hoped to follow the first televised contest between Democratic Vice President Al Gore and Republican Texas Gov. George W. Bush in the comfort of his suite at the luxury Biltmore Hotel in Coral Gables, a suburb of Miami.
Finding that his television did not work, Mr. Clinton wandered down to the hotel bar, where he bantered about debate strategy with reporters and discovered cable television was not working throughout the resort, Reuters reports.
So the president set out in a hastily gathered motorcade to the home of Chris and Irene Korge, where he earlier raised $75,000 for first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton's U.S. Senate campaign in New York, to watch the contest.
White House spokesman Jake Siewert told reporters that Mr. Clinton listened to Mr. Gore and Mr. Bush on the radio as his motorcade prowled through the dark, drenched streets of Miami, arriving at the Korges' home about half an hour after the debate began.
Despite these difficulties, Mr. Clinton had no problem pronouncing a winner.

"Didn't the vice president do a great job last night in that debate?" the president said during a fund-raising trip yesterday. "I was so proud of him."

Leader charged

The leader of a conservative legal foundation seeking to have President Clinton disbarred was charged with public indecency, the Associated Press reports.
An undercover federal officer said he saw Matthew J. Glavin fondling himself on May 17 on a trail in the Chattahoochee National River Park in Gwinnett County, just east of Atlanta. The officer said Mr. Glavin also fondled him after the two started talking.
Mr. Glavin, 47, president and chief executive of the Atlanta-based Southeastern Legal Foundation, denied the charges. He was in U.S. District Court in connection with the case on Tuesday, but did not enter a plea because his hearing was rescheduled.
The foundation, which Mr. Glavin has led since 1994, has fought to abolish Atlanta's affirmative-action program and sued to have Mr. Clinton disbarred for lying under oath in the Paula Jones sexual harassment case.

Glavin resigns

The leader of a conservative legal group seeking to have President Clinton disbarred resigned yesterday after his second arrest on public indecency charges, Cox News Service reports.

An undercover federal officer said he saw Matthew J. Glavin fondling himself May 17 on a trail in the Chattahoochee National River Park near Atlanta. The officer said Mr. Glavin also fondled him after the men started talking.

Mr. Glavin, 47, president and chief executive of the Atlanta-based Southeastern Legal Foundation, "adamantly denied" the charges. He was in U.S. District Court for the case Tuesday but did not enter a plea because his hearing was rescheduled.

Mr. Glavin pleaded no contest to a similar charge in 1996, and a federal judge sentenced him to six months of probation, Atlanta's WAGA-TV reported.

Mr. Glavin refused to confirm the report on the earlier charge. He said he resigned his post with the legal group, effective immediately, "to protect my family and the foundation." He declined to comment further.

The foundation has fought to abolish Atlanta's affirmative-action program and sued to have Mr. Clinton disbarred for lying under oath in the Paula Jones sexual harassment case.

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